Tag:Denver Nuggets
Posted on: July 6, 2011 11:46 am
Edited on: July 6, 2011 5:00 pm
 

Gallinari might look at Europe?

Posted by Royce Young

Another day, another NBA player maybe, sort of, kind of thinking about playing in Europe. Danilo Gallinari told Sportando that he "couldn't rule out" at least a short run in Europe.

Of course Gallinari is from Italy and spent the early part of his professional career playing in Europe.

But like any other NBA player currently under contract, Gallinari can't just pack up and sign with a European club. FIBA has yet to clear anyone under contract in the NBA and would be risking his contract with the Nuggets if he were injured.

He's just saying he has it on his mind, especially if games are going to be lost.

Gallinari though is a bigger name that's mentioned possibly playing in Europe. And really, it's one of the best bargaining chips the players have. They'd have to first get clearance to play, but I'm sure NBA owners aren't excited about watching players hustle overseas to get paid and also risk injury. Something to maybe rush along the proceedings?

One can only hope.
Posted on: June 30, 2011 1:31 am
Edited on: June 30, 2011 6:41 am
 

Report: Nene to opt out, become free agent

Denver Nuggets center Nene Hilarious will reportedly opt out and become a free agent. Posted by Ben Golliver. nene-hilario

The free agent class of 2011 isn't particularly strong. But it should be adding a fairly big name near the top.

The Denver Post reports that Denver Nuggets center Nene Hilario will opt out of the final year of his contract to become a free agent.
Nene is set to officially become a free agent.

The Nuggets starting center will opt out of the final year of his contract worth about $12 million and, as a result, become an unrestricted free agent, a source said Wednesday night. It means Nene can sign with any team without the Nuggets getting a chance to match the offer when free agency begins after the expected NBA lockout, which should begin Friday.

Nene had until Thursday to make a final decision.
Nene becomes arguably the second most desireable free agent on the entire market, trailing only Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol. His combination of size, athleticism, experience, proven production and age combine to make him a very attractive pick-up.  

The Nuggets, with Chris Andersen and Timofey Mozgov as their only big men currently under contract for next season, will be up a bit of a creek if they lose him to someone in free agency. 

Nene, 28, averaged 14.5 points and 7.6 rebounds in 75 games last season. Over the last three seasons, his production has been very consistent, as he's averaged roughly 14 points, more than 7.5 rebounds and at least a block per game.  He's showing no real signs of slippage -- indeed, he posted a careeer-high 61.5% field goal shooting this year -- and has missed just 12 combined games in the last three seasons.

His opt-out decision comes as a bit of a surprise, although he hinted that he would test free agency back in May. A few weeks ago, reports circulated that the Nuggets were close to an agreement, but nothing came to fruition. Their efforts to re-sign him will surely continue.

Here's a link to the 2011 NBA Free Agency tracker, where you can keep tabs on this year's entire crop.

Posted on: June 29, 2011 3:10 pm
Edited on: June 29, 2011 3:48 pm
 

2010-11 top 10 best moments

Posted by Royce Young



Some are saying the 2010-11 NBA season might've very well been the best in league history. History. What better way to top that off than with a debilitating lockout where players and owners haggle over money? Momentum!

But despite all the depressing lockout stuff, there's no doubt this past season was pretty special. It all started with a wild free agency period that was capped off with a one-hour special and a preseason celebration party in South Beach. It finished in that same place but instead with the Mavericks being the team that took their talents there.

It really was a pretty remarkable season. The NBA grabbed its highest ratings since the Jordan Era, had an amazing All-Star Weekend in Los Angeles, saw the rise of a bundle of young players that will carry the league to great places over the next 10 years and had polarizing teams and figures that had people talking constantly. I don't know that 2010-11 was the best ever, but for sure, it was really darn good.

And what better way to send it off than arbitrarily trying to wrap it all together in a list of 10 neato plays? There's no better way, that's what.

There were some pretty difficult omissions. Like Paul Millsap's 11 points in 28 seconds. Or Emeka Okafor's crazy buzzer-beater. Or that one Brian Cardinal thing he did that one time. Like any top 10, there were some tough cuts and I'm sure you'll disagree. Regardless, here are my top 10 moments from the season and 10 really good reasons why a lockout would totally suck.

10. Touchdown, Wade to LeBron
LeBron was a wide receiver in high school at St. Vincent - St. Mary. But I don't think Dwyane Wade was ever a quarterback. This play is pretty much what people were dreaming about the second LeBron announced he was teaming up with Wade. Two incredibly skilled players with stupid amounts of ability hooking up for a ridiculous play. Hate the Heat all you want, but you know you loved this play.

9. Taj has a moment, or two
It started with one of the ultimate posters of the season. Two hands, right over Dwyane Wade. It was so dirty that even Wade's children were giving him grief over it. Then he went ahead and followed that up with a follow-up finish in punctuate Chicago's Game 1 Eastern Finals win. Every time I watch these two dunks it makes me want to scream like I'm Carlos Boozer.

8. Love sees 30-30
Really, the top Kevin Love highlight from this season is probably his failed high five with Wesley Johnson. But I'll just recognize Love here with his second best moment of the season -- the first 30-30 game in, well, about 30 years. Love humliated the Knicks with a 31-point, 31-rebound effort doing something that no one has done since Moses Malone. Just look at that again: 31 points, 31 rebounds. Love was pretty unreal all season but that is just really outlandish.

7. The game that never ends
With the stakes high, the Thunder and Grizzlies needed 63 minutes of basketball to settle Game 4 of the Western Semifinals. Memphis led the series 2-1 after Oklahoma City blew a big fourth quarter lead in Game 3. What's crazy is that Memphis led by 18 in the first half of this game.

But the Thunder held a seven-point fourth quarter lead and finally lost it after Mike Conley hit an impossible 3 over Kendrick Perkins. Then Grievis Vasquez doubled down on the insanity by dropping another game-tying 3 in the first overtime. Eventually Kevin Durant and the Thunder wore down Memphis and took the game 133-123 and used that to top the Grizzlies in seven to move on to the Western Finals.

6. Indiana starts the third 20 for 20
How does 54 points in a half sound? Pretty good, right? Well, what about 54 in a quarter? That sounds like a pretty good number for an entire game if you're the Butler Bulldogs.

The Pacers started the third quarter against Denver 20-20 and would've had a perfect quarter had Mike Dunleavy not missed with a couple seconds remaining. For a team though to hit 20 consecutive shots? An entire team? If I'm George Karl and the Nuggets, at that point I'm not even guarding them just to see how many in a row they can hit.

5. Reke, from pretty far out
It looked like O.J. Mayo had just hit a nasty backbreaker for Memphis against the Kings. The Grizzlies went up one with 1.5 seconds left and Sacramento didn't have any timeouts left. No bother for Tyreke though as he launched from behind the halfcourt line and drilled a game-winner as time expired.

Still though, the most impressive part of this is the sixth sense from Donte Greene. He's entirely on the court already celebrating before the shot dropped. What would he have done if it had missed? I guess he just knew it wouldn't.

4. Coming back is easy to do for Dallas
Worst thing you can do: Put the Mavericks in a double-digit hole in the fourth quarter. Dallas had already pulled off two impressive comebacks against the Thunder and Lakers, but its Game 2 triumph over the Heat is really what won the Mavs an NBA title. Trailing by 15 points late after a Dwyane Wade 3, the Mavs turned it on with Dirk scoring the team's final nine points in the last two minutes to steal a game in Miami and probably a trophy right out from under LeBron and the Heat.

3. I believe that I just saw a man fly
Don't get in J.R. Smith's way. He won't just dunk over you, he'll dunk through you. With two hands.

2. Durant, Haywood and oh my goodness
Magic Johnson said this was the greatest postseason dunk ever. And considering the circumstances -- Game 2 of the Western Conference Finals -- he might have a point. Durant's Thunder were off to a bit of a slow start against the Mavs and faced falling into an 0-2 hole. But Durant woke up the team by throwing down right over Brendan Haywood.

Durant picked up a technical after the dunk for having some words for Haywood, but if I were the officials, I'd have just kicked Durant and everyone else out, because he basically turned out the lights right there.

1. Blake Griffin



Take your pick. Over Mozgov. Over Gallinari. Over a car. Oops from Baron, oops from Bledsoe, oops from Mo. The 2010-11 regular season was really kind of the season of Griffin and how he took over the world with YouTube highlights. No player has made people buzz quite like Griffin. Night to night, you had no idea what might be coming. When Blake Mania was reaching its peak in January, I think we all thought he might dunk over Andrew Bynum and Pau Gasol if Gasol was standing on Bynum's shoulders.

I still don't think we've seen the ultimate Blake Griffin highlight. And when it comes next year, that just means we'll have 2011-12's best moment. If there is one. Oh please for the love of James Naismith, let there be one.
Posted on: June 26, 2011 4:59 pm
Edited on: June 26, 2011 5:12 pm
 

Dantley let go by Karl because of 'backstabbing'

Former Denver Nuggets assistant coach Adrian Dantley tees off on his former boss, George Karl. Posted by Ben Golliver.

george-karl-adrian-dantley
The NBA coaching fraternity resembles the Free Masons when it comes to tight-lipped secrecy. Rarely will you hear one head coach comment negatively about another head coach, and assistant coaches -- who rotate on a carousel around the league and have precious little job security -- almost never say anything publicly aside from supporting their boss or offering banal observations before or after a game. 

In that context, former Denver Nuggets assistant coach Adrian Dantley's comments about his former boss, George Karl, qualify as an explosion. Dantley revealed in a New York Post column that his contract was not renewed by the Nuggets without warning, meaning he is now out of work. With an impending lockout and the early coaching carousel nearly complete, Dantley is obviously frustrated.

Then, in an interview posted on DenverStiffs.com, Dantley tapped into that frustration, claiming that he was let go because of how he handled himself after Karl was approached by other members of his coaching staff. Those coaches apparently wanted a chance to rotate into the front row of seats on Denver's bench, rather than sit behind the bench. Dantley, keep in mind, was the lead assistant on the staff and was tabbed by the organization to take over the head coaching spot when Karl dealt with throat cancer at the end of the 2009-2010 season.  
"I didn’t rotate,’’ said Dantley, an NBA star forward from 1976-2001 who was named in 2008 to the Hall of Fame. "I wasn’t going to rotate. If they (other assistants) want the publicity to sit up front, I don’t need the publicity… I got no problem not being seen on TV and sitting at the back of the bench.’’

Dantley would not single out any specific assistants. The New York Post reported "one or two lower-level assistants’’ suggested the rotation to Karl.

"This had to do with a whole lot of backstabbing,’’ Dantley said. "I got fired because I wouldn’t rotate. And people felt uncomfortable (about that).’’
Let's unwrap this, because it all seems really petty at first glance. Clearly, Dantley felt disrspected by the idea that he should have to rotate as part of the group of assistants. Given the time he had served, the fact that he was tapped to fill in for Karl when he was out, and the status quo that had existed before, it's definitely reasonable for him to raise questions about why a change to this policy was needed. From Dantley's perspective, nothing was broken, so why fix it?

Karl has been an NBA head coach for 23 years and he's earned a reputation for managing difficult personalities. He's handled much more difficult situations than this. (He coached J.R. Smith.) From Karl's perspective, once he decided to have his assistants rotate, everyone should have gotten on board with the decision. By refusing to rotate, Dantley was undermining Karl's authority, the ultimate no-no in coaching circles. Dantley's action might not have been an "on the spot" fireable offense but you can understand why it would peeve Karl.

The big questions here: Why did Karl decide to institute a rotation in the first place and were Denver's assistants really that desperate and bold to request a seat in front? Those are questions we might never get answers to. But from an NBA head coach's perspective, they aren't that important. When you coach in such a high-pressure, low-security environment with endless available alternatives to fill out your coaching staff, everything is "My way or the highway." Karl apparently issued his ruling and he expected it to be final. Dantley didn't like it and that festered. Karl waited until the offseason and then expressed his authority in full. End of debate. 

The lessons here?

One: Assistant coaches, even long-tenured and respected ones like Dantley, have zero leverage.

Two: This situation seems like it could have been avoided with a few well-timed conversations between Karl and Dantley. In that respect, communication breakdowns and personality conflicts in the NBA are the same as they are anywhere else.
Posted on: June 24, 2011 1:27 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 4:08 am
 

NBA Draft: Five biggest surprises

Posted by Royce Young



The build-up to this year's draft had a pretty wild feel to it. With the chance of a lockout ahead, teams appeared to be frantically positioning for a crazy night of trading and movement. A lot went according to plan. Kyrie Irving went No. 1 overall to Cleveland. Derrick Williams was taken right after by Minnesota. Enes Kanter went to Utah third.

There were some surprises though. Some players that dropped a bit farther than expected or climbed up the ladder to get taken four or five spots ahead of expectation. For instance, Josh Selby fell all the way down to 49 to Memphis, which is pretty remarkable. But the 49th overall pick is pretty unremarkable. So here are my biggest five draft night surprises:

1. Tristan Thompson, PF, Cleveland Cavaliers (4): Some prognosticators saw the Cavs going either with Jonas Valanciunas or Thompson here, especially with Kanter coming off the board to Utah at No. 3. But Thompson was mostly slated on big boards somewhere in the 7-10 region. The Cavs didn't necessarily reach on him, as they need more front court depth, but Thompson might've been available a couple slots lower as well.

I imagine the Cavs wanted Kanter and took their second choice with Thompson, but passing over Valanciunas is a bit surprising. The buyout issue for Valanciunas probably had a lot to do with it.

2. Iman Shumpert, PG, New York Knicks (17): The Knicks were hoping homegrown point guard Kemba Walker would somehow free fall to them at 17, but instead, New York picked up Shumpert, a junior guard out of Georgia Tech. The Knicks contingent in the building promptly said, "Who?" and commenced booing.

It's not a bad pick by any means, as the Knicks need a player to groom behind Chauncey Billups, plus, he does offer a little size and athleticism. Shumpert is 6-6 and already a terrific defender, something the Knicks need more than a good scorer. But 17 is a bit high for Shumpert since most saw him as a late first-round guy. Chris Singleton, Kenneth Faried and Marshon Brooks were still on the board at 17,  so some are curious why New York passed them over for Shumpert.

3. Markieff Morris, F, Phoenix Suns (13): Sort of a minor surprise here, but most figured younger brother Marcus was the higher ranked prospect of the two. Naturally, I had to wonder if maybe Lon Babby and the Suns just mixed the two up here. (Twin joke!) It is relatively interesting that Markieff, born seven minutes ahead of Marcus, was picked one spot ahead, almost exactly seven minutes earlier. Some things are just meant to be.

4. Jordan Hamilton, SF, Denver Nuggets (26): Hamilton was taken by the Mavericks and, after mass confusion, ended up being part of a three-way trade that sent him to Denver. But most had the Texas swingman pegged in the 15-20 range. And when he dropped past Houston at 23, it looked like almost a certainty that Oklahoma City would snatch him up at 24.

Yet, he was passed over. There was word that Texas coach Rick Barnes warned teams that Hamilton is uncoachable and that's the reason he slipped. A couple weeks ago he was a borderline lottery pick, but on draft night he barely survived the first round.

5. Corey Joseph, PG, San Antonio Spurs (29): Once the Spurs pushed the button on a trade to send George Hill to Indiana for Kawhi Leonard, you knew San Antonio was going to look to restock its depth. Just not many saw them targeting Joseph.

Joseph played one year at Texas and was a nice, highly-recruited defender, but didn't really impress many. He was pegged as a middle second round guy, so when David Stern called his name with the 29th pick, some were a bit shocked. He has the same frame as George Hill and might be able to settle into that exact some role. Plus, with the Spurs, everything they do seems brilliant. They're sort of like a new Radiohead album in that way. They escape the critics even when something doesn't quite add up because they've earned it with a glowing reputation.
Posted on: June 24, 2011 12:37 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 11:20 am
 

2011 NBA Draft Winners and Losers



Posted by Matt Moore

It's all over. After an underwhelming crop of draft choices led to a flurry of trades, the dust has settled and the picks are wearing the right hats, finally. Here are your winners and losers of the 2011 NBA Draft:

Winners

Cleveland Cavaliers: Irving is mostly a case of winning by default, but they wouldn't have been the first team to be unable to get out of their own way with an obvious pick. Irving gives them a franchise point guard to build around and was the best player overall in this draft. Going for Derrick Williams would have been sheer hubris in order to burn LeBron by choosing a replacement forward. Then, with the fourth, they could have opted for Valanciunas, which would have been a good pick. But there's a reason so many teams were chasing Tristan Thompson. His workouts showed how he would translate on the next level, and with that kind of athleticism, he provides a good running partner for Irving. They managed to not overcomplicate the combination of two top-five picks. They got good talent both small and big. That's a win right there.

Washington Wizards: The Wizards very quietly had a terrific draft. First Jan Vesely was available, who fits a need for them at slashing forward. With his athleticism and aggression, he makes a perfect partner to run the break with John Wall. Then, miraculously, Chris Singleton tumbled all the way down to No.18 where the Wizards jumped all over him. Singleton is a lottery talent that fell out of the top 14. He gives the Wizards the ability to move Andray Blatche if they can find a taker for his contract. He can rebound and defend exceptionally well. Singleton's length and athleticism, combined with a chip on his shoulder from dropping, makes him a great pick for the Wizards. Shelvin Mack in the second round was a great value pick for backup point guard.

Charlotte Bobcats: In a day, the Bobcats transformed Stephen Jackson, Shaun Livingston, the No.9 and No.19 into Corey Maggette, Bismack Biyombo, and Kemba Walker. That's a great haul. I've never been big on either of the Bobcats' draft picks, but when you consider the balance between an athletic super-freak who is unrefined and an established winner with limited upside, the Bobcats managed to grab two of the most hyped players in the draft. Biyombo provides length and athleticism to pair with Tyrus Thomas. Walker creates a complication at point guard with D.J. Augustin already being an undersized point guard. But Augustin has never won over the Bobcats organization and Walker will be given every chance to compete for the starting role. If his size issues aren't as much a concern as they've been made out to be, and if his shot creation translates to the next level, the Bobcats have just instantly created their foundation for the future while ditching one of their biggest contracts. A great start for the Cho era in Charlotte. 

Denver Nuggets: Raymond Felton got flipped for Andre Miller's non-guaranteed expiring contract and Jordan Hamilton, one of the steals of the draft who inexplicably fell. This for a guard the Nuggets didn't want in the first place. Oh, yeah, and they nabbed Kenneth Faried, who perfectly fits their needs and is a great value pick where they took him. Masai Ujiri is better than you.


Losers


Minnesota Timberwolves: Yes, again. Williams is a great pick, if they were moving Michael Beasley. Or if they were trading Williams. But David Kahn reportedly says they're not moving Williams. They wasted an opportunity to create more assets by moving either one, and instead, will now bullheadedly try to cram two similar players (three if you count Anthony Randolph) into a spot. It's a messy situation and Kahn should have taken one of the other offers made to him for the pick. Then there's the other trade, which was just a mess all over. They pulled in another Euro center to add to their collection, Brad Miller and his too-long, too-expensive contract, and ditched Jonny Flynn. The only redeeming quality is the future first which may or may not be protected into oblivion. Another sterling night for the Wolves. If Williams turns out to be worthy of the No.2 pick, and count me among the people that think he is, and the Wolves recognize that versus burying him as they did Kevin Love, this can be salvaged. From this vantage point, it doesn't look great. 

Update: Wolves wound up swapping Mirotic for the 28th and 43rd picks from the Bulls, then moved the 28th pick to Miami for the 31st pick, which they then sold as well as the 38th pick which was theirs. They used the 43rd on Malcolm Lee, and then traded for the 57th. While not getting Mirotic is a lot better than drafting him, they did all that and wound up with a first later, Malcolm Lee, and Targuy Ngombo. Not a great haul, there. Saved the boss some cash, though.

Golden State Warriors: How many guards can they need? New head coach Mark Jackson and GM Larry Riley constantly talked about defense. Then the Warriors took a shooter. They haven't moved Monta Ellis, so now on the roster they have Stephen Curry, Monta Ellis, Charlie Bell, Jeremy Lin, Acie Law and Reggie Williams. And they just added Klay Thompson. It was an unnecessary move with bigger players with more defensive presence available. The Warriors have enough talent to not need the best player available. But, again, they opt for the usual. Disappointing.

Portland Trail Blazers: Where did that come from? The Blazers first take a huge reach on Nolan Smith at No.21. Smith had his proponents as the draft got closer, and certainly isn't a terrible pick. But in taking him, they elected to create redundancy after trading too much (Andre Miller and Rudy Fernandez) for Raymond Felton. The result is a reformed back court as the Blazers had promised, but not nearly as good as one you would have thought they could carry with the pieces available. Smith may work out well, but he'll never be starter caliber. And, with as many talented guards as there were late in the draft, taking him was a bit of a shock. Jon Diebler is 6-6 and can shoot. That's about it.  


Individual Winners:


Jan Vesely: Underrated as everyone talked about Kanter and Valanciunas, Vesely not only winds up with a good team fit for himself, but stole the highlight of the night with a kiss on the mouth of his lady friend. Then he said "I like the John Wall game" in his TV interview. Vesely came off incredibly cool for a 21-year-old Euro who can't shoot.

Tristan Thompson: Congratulations, Tristan, you cleared about ten spots in three days! It's a marathon, not a race.

Joe Dumars: Lucks into Brandon Knight. Rodney Stuckey problem: solved.


Individual Losers:


Brandon Knight: Plummeted due to his attitude and wound up in dysfunctional Detroit.

Josh Selby: If there was no age limit to the draft, Selby would have been a top ten pick last year. Now he falls all the way to the second round.

Jordan Hamilton: Something really bad must have been found on Hamilton, medically or otherwise. There was a nineteen-pick differential between Hamilton and a player who has rumors of being older than listed with a back issue and a contract problem. That's not a good look for the Texas ex.
Posted on: June 23, 2011 9:58 pm
Edited on: June 23, 2011 10:43 pm
 

NBA TRADE: Nuggets, Blazers, Mavs swap

Posted by Matt Moore

Update 10:17 p.m.: Ken Berger reports that the deal is more complicated. The Blazers also traded Rudy Fernandez to the Dallas Mavericks for the 26th pick in the draft, which they then immediately shipped to Denver (Jordan Hamilton). So to recap:

Portland receives: Raymond Felton

Denver receives: Andre Miller, Jordan Hamilton (by way of Dallas' 26th pick)

Dallas receives: Rudy Fernandez

Fernandez goes to the world champions who need a wing player with energy. The Mavericks are an old team and wouldn't have room for another young player like Hamilton, now get Fernandez who can hit from the outside (3-goggles!) but who was also disappointing and inconsistent for Portland. 

Winner: Denver. They managed to get Miller who is a cash dump and can play backup point guard, and an athletic forward to replace Wilson Chandler who will presumably now not be retained in free agency, and they didn't have to surrender Kenneth Faried who they took at No.22. More young assets and all they moved was Felton who they weren't committed to anyway and who wanted out. 

Loser: Portland gave up their starting point guard and Rudy Fernandez for Raymond Felton. Felton is good. He really is. But he's not starter-plus-sixth-man-for-him good. Not a good start to the post-Cho era in Portland. 

Original report:

In a trade that does not feel like a trade at all, Yahoo! Sports reports that the Nuggets have traded Raymond Felton to the Portland Trail Blazers for Andre Miller. 

The Nuggets essentially swapped Felton and his longer-term contract for Miller who has a team option for 2011-2012 and is an expiring deal after that. The Nuggets may not pick up the option on Miller, or may keep him for one more year as a backup to Ty Lawson. Felton was unhappy from the get-go in Denver after getting bumped to the bench for the younger Lawson.

For Portland, they've been looking to upgrade their point guard position for close to a year and Felton was available and cheap.  Felton likely won't have the chemistry Miller had with LaMarcus Aldridge or his lob ability, but he has better scoring ability, is younger, and a better defender as Miller fades with age. 

The Denver Post reports that the Nuggets also acquired the 26th pick from Dallas (not known what Dallas recieves), and a future second.
Posted on: June 21, 2011 8:49 pm
 

Report: Raymond Felton rumors heating up

Posted by Matt Moore

So it's come to this for Raymond Felton. From underrated point guard in Charlotte, helping the Bobcats make their first playoff game, to heralded new York Knicks point guard of the future, to Carmelo Anthony trade bait, and now this. Shopped for a lousy draft pick in a lousy draft.

ESPN reports:
Would the Kings be willing to send the No. 7 pick to the Nuggets for Raymond Felton and the No. 22 pick? The Kings have had interest in Felton but it's probably going to take them giving up the No. 7 pick to get him. I wouldn't be shocked to see the Nuggets grab Jonas Valanciunas or Bismack Biyombo if they could get up to No. 7.
via Latest draft buzz: Kings' No. 7 for Felton? - TrueHoop Blog - ESPN.

When Felton landed in Denver, I was positive he was going to start. He'd been a starter for years, was a better defender than Lawson, and would pitch a fit if he was benched for such a young player. But credit to the Nuggets, they knew that Lawson was their guy going forward and they stuck with him. Now Felton wants out, and the Nuggets are happy to oblige him, especially if they can get another young asset to their army of young assets. The No. 7 pick isn't exactly a goldmine in this draft, they'll have a shot at a few high caliber prospects, though you'd have to question if Bismack Biyombo is really the kind of player they want to add to a team that needs substantial help down low besides Nene. The Nuggets would also be in a position of need for a backup point guard if this were to shake out.

Felton is a perfect fit in Sacramento, despite what will probably bum him out in being in a smaller market again, overshadowed by younger players who haven't been around as long. A starting 1-2-3-4 rotation of Felton, Marcus Thornton, Tyreke Evans at a combo 2-3 spot and DeMarcus Cousins gives the Kings a foundation going forward. They've needed a steady hand at point guard and could certainly use Felton's defense. 

Maybe it'll work out for Felton, but it's still got to be a disappointment to have gone from the wanted sidekick star in New York under a coach that makes point guards look great to being unable to unseat a younger player on a rebuilding team and getting shopped for a draft pick in a poor class. Someone get the guy a hug. Wait a minute, he got that new contract from New York last summer and Larry Brown is no longer haunting him. Nevermind, he's good.  
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com