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Tag:Memphis Grizzlies
Posted on: July 10, 2011 5:22 pm
Edited on: July 10, 2011 5:38 pm
 

What teams risk in a lockout: Southwest Division

Posted by Royce Young



Talk of losing an entire NBA season is a bit ridiculous. But it's a possibility. And with all this hardline talk going on, it seems like neither the players nor the owners are wanting to budge. There's incentive for teams to get a deal done and not just for the money, but because a year without basketball and more importantly, basketball operations, could greatly affect each and every NBA franchise.

Earlier, we took a look at the Southeast, Atlantic and Central Divisions. Let's continue on with the rough and tumble, yet aging, Southwest Division.

New Orleans Hornets

The Hornets easily present the most interesting lockout case of any team in my mind. First off, the league owns them. Secondly, and related to that, Chris Paul is a free agent in 2012. The league took on the responsibility of the Hornets because David Stern wasn't about to see a franchise lost on his watch and wants to do everything he can to keep the team there.

But a prolonged lockout resulting in a lost season really might end professional basketball in New Orleans. Chris Paul would have the ability to walk with the Hornets never having an chance to get anything in return, meaning the one draw the team has could be gone and the already struggling franchise might not have anything to show for his exit. On top of that, David West opted out and is an unrestricted free agent currently. So not only could the roster be entirely turned over, the already suspect fanbase might take another blow.

Now of course if Stern and the owners can negotiate a deal that makes a franchise like the Hornets profitable no matter what, then the league can sell the team and potentially pocket a bit. That's obviously something in the back of Stern's mind. The Hornets really make this lockout all the more intriguing because now Stern has a stake in things directly. He's not just the mediator trying to produce a good system for his league, but he's an owner too now.

Dallas Mavericks

Here's one benefit of a prolonged lockout: The Mavs get to be champs for two years instead of one. Bonus? I don't think they'd think so. Especially because the window the Mavs have to remain serious contenders isn't going to stay open much longer. Dirk is aging, Jason Kidd is like 78 and there are a bunch of questions surrounding players like Tyson Chandler, Caron Butler and J.J. Barea.

Mark Cuban is a big market owner, but I can see him as someone leaning toward making sure there is basketball over the owners guaranteeing profits. He's a fan first and foremost and he's tasted the top of the mountain. Granted, he gets the chance to soak it up a little longer, but if he wants his roster to keep going, losing a year might be the beginning of the end for the current Mavs.

San Antonio Spurs

There's no hiding that the Spurs are getting older. A year lost means another year tacked on to Tim Duncan, Manu Ginobili and Tony Parker. A year lost means Gregg Popovich gets a little older and as the longest tenured coach in the league, he might not have many left. The Spurs have a fanbase that will absolutely return in force and Peter Holt is maybe the finest owner in the league, especially in terms of managing a small market franchise, but I'm sure a year of lost basketball isn't something that sits well.

Holt obviously would love a system that levels the playing field a bit and helps smaller markets on the road to basking in the same light the Lakers, Bulls and Knicks get, but basketball is a priority in San Antonio. The window won't be open much longer. Even Tony Parker acknowledged that. And that roster still wants to try and make one more run at it all.

Memphis Grizzlies
Really, Michael Heisley probably isn't all that terrified from losing a season. He's a small market owner who has spent big as of late and saving money on Rudy Gay, Zach Randolph and Mike Conley isn't all bad for him. The core of the team, sans Marc Gasol, is all locked up long-term so while a lost season would mean missing out on all the positive movement and momentum from last season, there's still a lot of opportunity ahead for Memphis.

Still, it's a risk to mess with a potentially fragile fanbase like the Grizzlies'. The FedEx Forum has never been known to be full, but during the postseason run, the Grizzlies emerged with one of the most passionate, loyal crowds in the league. There's clearly something working right now and Heisley and the Grizzlies don't want to jade and sour those fans that have come around by damaging all that goodwill they worked so hard to build.

Houston Rockets
Hard for me to guess how the Rockets see this thing. They are an in-between franchise, not necessarily small market but not big either. Their roster is set up to withstand a lockout and return with good pieces intact. They don't have any major lingering free agents of concern.

What I think would scare them a bit though is missing out on the opportunity to compete in the trade market for players like Dwight Howard, Chris Paul and Deron Williams all season long though. The Rockets have quality trade pieces and good assets to dangle in front of teams and I'm sure Daryl Morey would have some interesting proposals to make. Sure there's always 2012's free agency but opening it up to that puts the Rockets a bit behind the other, more intriguing, brighter markets. A sign-and-trade might be their best chance to land that superstar player Morey so desperately wants.
Posted on: June 29, 2011 3:10 pm
Edited on: June 29, 2011 3:48 pm
 

2010-11 top 10 best moments

Posted by Royce Young



Some are saying the 2010-11 NBA season might've very well been the best in league history. History. What better way to top that off than with a debilitating lockout where players and owners haggle over money? Momentum!

But despite all the depressing lockout stuff, there's no doubt this past season was pretty special. It all started with a wild free agency period that was capped off with a one-hour special and a preseason celebration party in South Beach. It finished in that same place but instead with the Mavericks being the team that took their talents there.

It really was a pretty remarkable season. The NBA grabbed its highest ratings since the Jordan Era, had an amazing All-Star Weekend in Los Angeles, saw the rise of a bundle of young players that will carry the league to great places over the next 10 years and had polarizing teams and figures that had people talking constantly. I don't know that 2010-11 was the best ever, but for sure, it was really darn good.

And what better way to send it off than arbitrarily trying to wrap it all together in a list of 10 neato plays? There's no better way, that's what.

There were some pretty difficult omissions. Like Paul Millsap's 11 points in 28 seconds. Or Emeka Okafor's crazy buzzer-beater. Or that one Brian Cardinal thing he did that one time. Like any top 10, there were some tough cuts and I'm sure you'll disagree. Regardless, here are my top 10 moments from the season and 10 really good reasons why a lockout would totally suck.

10. Touchdown, Wade to LeBron
LeBron was a wide receiver in high school at St. Vincent - St. Mary. But I don't think Dwyane Wade was ever a quarterback. This play is pretty much what people were dreaming about the second LeBron announced he was teaming up with Wade. Two incredibly skilled players with stupid amounts of ability hooking up for a ridiculous play. Hate the Heat all you want, but you know you loved this play.

9. Taj has a moment, or two
It started with one of the ultimate posters of the season. Two hands, right over Dwyane Wade. It was so dirty that even Wade's children were giving him grief over it. Then he went ahead and followed that up with a follow-up finish in punctuate Chicago's Game 1 Eastern Finals win. Every time I watch these two dunks it makes me want to scream like I'm Carlos Boozer.

8. Love sees 30-30
Really, the top Kevin Love highlight from this season is probably his failed high five with Wesley Johnson. But I'll just recognize Love here with his second best moment of the season -- the first 30-30 game in, well, about 30 years. Love humliated the Knicks with a 31-point, 31-rebound effort doing something that no one has done since Moses Malone. Just look at that again: 31 points, 31 rebounds. Love was pretty unreal all season but that is just really outlandish.

7. The game that never ends
With the stakes high, the Thunder and Grizzlies needed 63 minutes of basketball to settle Game 4 of the Western Semifinals. Memphis led the series 2-1 after Oklahoma City blew a big fourth quarter lead in Game 3. What's crazy is that Memphis led by 18 in the first half of this game.

But the Thunder held a seven-point fourth quarter lead and finally lost it after Mike Conley hit an impossible 3 over Kendrick Perkins. Then Grievis Vasquez doubled down on the insanity by dropping another game-tying 3 in the first overtime. Eventually Kevin Durant and the Thunder wore down Memphis and took the game 133-123 and used that to top the Grizzlies in seven to move on to the Western Finals.

6. Indiana starts the third 20 for 20
How does 54 points in a half sound? Pretty good, right? Well, what about 54 in a quarter? That sounds like a pretty good number for an entire game if you're the Butler Bulldogs.

The Pacers started the third quarter against Denver 20-20 and would've had a perfect quarter had Mike Dunleavy not missed with a couple seconds remaining. For a team though to hit 20 consecutive shots? An entire team? If I'm George Karl and the Nuggets, at that point I'm not even guarding them just to see how many in a row they can hit.

5. Reke, from pretty far out
It looked like O.J. Mayo had just hit a nasty backbreaker for Memphis against the Kings. The Grizzlies went up one with 1.5 seconds left and Sacramento didn't have any timeouts left. No bother for Tyreke though as he launched from behind the halfcourt line and drilled a game-winner as time expired.

Still though, the most impressive part of this is the sixth sense from Donte Greene. He's entirely on the court already celebrating before the shot dropped. What would he have done if it had missed? I guess he just knew it wouldn't.

4. Coming back is easy to do for Dallas
Worst thing you can do: Put the Mavericks in a double-digit hole in the fourth quarter. Dallas had already pulled off two impressive comebacks against the Thunder and Lakers, but its Game 2 triumph over the Heat is really what won the Mavs an NBA title. Trailing by 15 points late after a Dwyane Wade 3, the Mavs turned it on with Dirk scoring the team's final nine points in the last two minutes to steal a game in Miami and probably a trophy right out from under LeBron and the Heat.

3. I believe that I just saw a man fly
Don't get in J.R. Smith's way. He won't just dunk over you, he'll dunk through you. With two hands.

2. Durant, Haywood and oh my goodness
Magic Johnson said this was the greatest postseason dunk ever. And considering the circumstances -- Game 2 of the Western Conference Finals -- he might have a point. Durant's Thunder were off to a bit of a slow start against the Mavs and faced falling into an 0-2 hole. But Durant woke up the team by throwing down right over Brendan Haywood.

Durant picked up a technical after the dunk for having some words for Haywood, but if I were the officials, I'd have just kicked Durant and everyone else out, because he basically turned out the lights right there.

1. Blake Griffin



Take your pick. Over Mozgov. Over Gallinari. Over a car. Oops from Baron, oops from Bledsoe, oops from Mo. The 2010-11 regular season was really kind of the season of Griffin and how he took over the world with YouTube highlights. No player has made people buzz quite like Griffin. Night to night, you had no idea what might be coming. When Blake Mania was reaching its peak in January, I think we all thought he might dunk over Andrew Bynum and Pau Gasol if Gasol was standing on Bynum's shoulders.

I still don't think we've seen the ultimate Blake Griffin highlight. And when it comes next year, that just means we'll have 2011-12's best moment. If there is one. Oh please for the love of James Naismith, let there be one.
Posted on: June 28, 2011 7:36 pm
Edited on: June 28, 2011 7:56 pm
 

Antoine Walker pleads guilty in Vegas debt mess

Former NBA All-Star Antoine Walker pleaded guilty in a Las Vegas gambling debt mess. Posted by Ben Golliver. antoine-walker

The trials and tribulations of Antoine Walker have added yet another chapter.

On Tuesday, the Las Vegas Sun reported that Walker, a former NBA All-Star who played for the Boston Celtics and Miami Heat, among other teams, pleaded guilty to felony charges in Nevada over unpaid gambling debts reportedly totalling more than $750,000.
Professional basketball's Antoine Walker pleaded guilty to felony bad check charges Tuesday morning in Clark County District Court.

“Being put on probation, he’ll have a court order to pay the restitution to the casinos,” said Deputy District Attorney Sam Bateman.

The criminal complaint was filed in the summer of 2009, when Walker failed to pay back gambling debts at Caesars Palace, Planet Hollywood and the Red Rock Resort. He pleaded not guilty to six felony counts related to drawing checks without sufficient funds with attempt to defraud in June 2010, before changing his plea Tuesday.
In November, word surfaced that Walker, 34, was headed to play for the Stampede, where he averaged 16.0 points, 6.3 rebounds and 3.4 assists in 43 games this season.

His expressed goal of playing in the D-League was to hook on with an NBA team for a final run. He last played in the NBA for the Minnesota Timberwolves during the 2007-2008 season and was waived by the Memphis Grizzlies in Dec. 2008 without appearing in any regular season games. Since then, he played professionally in Puerto Rico.

Walker was known for his extravagant spending during his NBA career, reportedly amassing a large collection of automobiles and multiple houses.

This is how the decade-long party ends. With lawyers vacuuming up every last dollar bill.
Posted on: June 25, 2011 5:12 pm
Edited on: June 25, 2011 6:31 pm
 

2011 NBA Draft: 5 second round steals

Here's a look at five second round steals in the 2011 NBA Draft. Posted by Ben Golliver. davis-bertans

1. Davis Bertans -- San Antonio Spurs at No. 42

Acquiring George Hill for picks was a nice win-now move for the Indiana Pacers, but the San Antonio Spurs did very well to get value in the package coming back. Snagging Kawhi Leonard, the major slipper in the first round, was a great move. Picking up Bertans, a Latvian forward with first round potential, was arguably even better. That Bertans fell to No. 42 and the Spurs, historically one of the smartest organizations in the NBA, seems almost unfair. An excellent shooter with great length and a bit of handle to boot, Bertans can develop at his own pace overseas, ready to inject talent when needed in the post-Duncan era.

2. Darius Morris -- Los Angeles Lakers at No. 41

The Lakers needed to address the point guard position after exiting the playoffs earlier than usual this year. The aging Derek Fisher and the frantic Steve Blake didn't perform up to expectations and there are question marks about Shannon Brown's future in Los Angeles. Morris, who has often drawn comparisons to Andre Miller for his play-making and size, was the best point guard remaining on the board and had been considered a first round prospect by some talent evaluators. The Lakers filled a hole beautifully and hedge nicely against Father Time. 

3. Josh Selby -- Memphis Grizzlies at No. 49

Did anyone fall further than Josh Selby? A top high school talent endured a confusing and disappointing single season at Kansas before bailing to the pros as a one-and-done. Anyone snatching him up in the second round, given those circumstances, was getting good value. That he lasted until No. 49 is pretty amazing. Memphis -- led by no-nonsense coach Lionel Hollins -- showed this season that it can keep difficult personalities and egos in check and turn a group of cast-offs into a team that defeated the San Antonio Spurs in the first round of the Western Conference playoffs. If Selby is able to stick and get his career back on track, his scoring ability in the backcourt would make a trade of O.J. Mayo less painful. If not, the Grizzlies can simply cut their losses. All-reward, no-risk here.

4. Jeremy Tyler -- Golden State Warriors at No. 39

Jeremy Tyler is a risk, without question, and the Warriors are already reportedly $2 million deep into that risk after purchasing the pick used to select him from the Charlotte Bobcats. Tyler was a top 15 talent in this year's draft crop, once regarded as the best high school player in his class. He's shown signs of maturation and his offensive instincts are fairly well-honed. He will need to grow up as a professional but the same goes for many in this class. Getting him on a second-round contract with the flexibility of a non-guaranteed deal means he is on a tight leash and will have every reason to be on his best behavior. He's in a position where he's got to prove himself all over again to really see an NBA payday, the type of which he expected when he left high school early to play overseas years ago. Getting him fully in shape to reach that goal is the first step. No one should be surprised if he becomes the most talented player picked in the second round within two or three years. Golden State needed to get tougher and bulkier inside, which they did here. 

5. Andrew Goudelock -- Los Angeles Lakers at No. 46

Goudelock is a small school scoring point guard without much of a defensive reputation. That description alone carries plenty of question marks and risks. But the Lakers -- with Kobe Bryant, Andrew Bynum, Paul Gasol and Andrew Bynum in the fold -- have the talent, not to mention the deep pocketbooks, to sustain those risks with ease. As the guard trio of Bryant, Fisher and Blake ages, GM Mitch Kupchak's job was simply to inject the roster with youth and upside. In taking both Morris and Goudelock in the second round, he gets two different looks to fulfill that goal. Given that they are both on second-round deals, he only needs one of them to stick. The fact that both guards have the upside to be rotation players -- in L.A. or elsewhere -- means the Lakers landed two solid assets late in a shallow pool. That's intelligent drafting.
Posted on: June 1, 2011 12:06 pm
 

Bulls, Grizzlies rumored to want Monta Ellis

Posted by Matt Moore

Monta Ellis has entered into that rather uncomfortable zone where he's not traded, but everyone expects him to be. He's not gone, but it's kind of assumeed he will be. He's still with Golden State, only not really. He's been rumored to have been on the trade block for close to a year now, with Stephen Curry considered the guard of the future.

Now the Contra Costa Times reports that the Warriors are considering trading Ellis again, and more aggressively following the makeover planned by new owners with Joe Lacob leading the charge. The addition of Jerry West to the ownership and front office group only strengthens that idea, with Ellis being considered the bait to kickstart the reshaping of the Warriors in a more defensive-minded structure. The Contra Costa Times' Tim Kawakami lays out both sides of the argument for trading or not trading Ellis, and brings up the Bulls and Grizzlies as those in consideration for a trade:

 
Then there is the matter of getting the right deal for Ellis, who is due $11 million in each of the next three seasons.

After checking with a few NBA sources, two teams kept coming up — both with the combination of potential interest and the right roster pieces to intrigue West and the Warriors.

They were:

Chicago, which might have been a big-time perimeter scorer away from pushing Miami to the brink in the Eastern Conference finals. Would the Bulls think about Luol Deng for Ellis? Could the Warriors sweeten that offer?

And Memphis, West’s old team, which has Rudy Gay at a huge salary and which offered O.J. Mayo for Ellis in the recent past.

That doesn’t mean it will be easy for the Warriors to trade Ellis — emotionally or practically. It will take some guts. But again, that’s precisely why West was brought to the Warriors in the first place.
via Trade Monta Ellis? Jerry West just might be the guy to do it | Talking Points.

The Grizzlies from all indications have no intention of trading Rudy Gay, despite the team's success without him in the playoffs. Multiple reports have surfaced linking the Grizzlies to trade talks for Gay, but almost all come from media on the other side of the trade, not from Memphis. The Grizzlies would love to have Ellis, as Kawakami mentions the near Mayo-Ellis swap, but Mayo's value is no longer high enough to support such a trade, if it ever was to begin with. As a result, Memphis is an unlikely target.

The Bulls are an interesting fit. Coach Tom Thibodeau has taken players with questionable defensive ability (Keith Bogans, Carlos Boozer, Kyle Korver) and made them a part of the best defensive unit in basketball. Could he manage to cover Ellis' defensive liabilities in the same manner while adding a pure scorer to work off-ball with Rose and give the MVP a break from hoisting the offense on his shoulders. This would make a lot of sense from a lot of angles, but giving up Deng is giving up the emotional backbone of the Bulls and a key locker room guy, not to mention their best wing defender. The Bulls would be in a jam were they to make the move.

Still, the odds seem to be increasing that Ellis will not be in the Bay when the NBA kicks back up again.... whenever it kicks back up again.  
Posted on: May 23, 2011 12:04 pm
Edited on: May 23, 2011 12:33 pm
 

Manu Ginobili played with a broken arm

Manu Ginobili reveals he suffered a broken arm, played through it. 

Posted by Matt Moore

Manu Ginobili may be a flopper, but don't you dare call him soft. In an interview with an Argentinian website, translated by ProjectSpurs.com, Ginobili revealed that during the Spurs' first round series against the Grizzlies, he did not have an elbow sprain as reported by the Spurs. No, no, he had a broken arm. Here's the messy translation from ProjectSpurs.com: 
 
"Last Wednesday, the medical staff of San Antonio I had the last MRI. The liquid has been absorbed and small fracture in the humerus is welded at 85 percent. I have to be doing nothing for 3 weeks and then begin slowly."
via Ginobili says Spurs did not pressure him into not playing this summer, updates his elbow injury | May.

Forget LeBron's cold. forget even Rondo's dislocated elbow, though that was pretty gritty as well. Ginobili not only played through a broken arm, but was effective in multiple games with a broken arm. Notably during the series in a fast break collision, Tony Allen landed right on top of that arm of Manu's, and Ginobili still got up and hit the free throw.

There's tough, there's super-tough, there's incredibly tough, and then there's Manu Ginobili. Memphis played exceptionally well in that series and deserved to win. But you have to wonder how things would have been for the top-seeded Spurs had Ginobili not been playing with a fractured wing.

(HT San Antonio Express News) 
Posted on: May 22, 2011 11:59 am
Edited on: May 22, 2011 6:56 pm
 

Rose denies saying PEDs 'huge' issue in NBA

Chicago Bulls point guard Derrick Rose says the NBA has a "huge" issue with performance enhancing drugs. Posted by Ben Golliver. derrick-rose-usa

Update (2:02 p.m.): Rose denied making the "huge issue" statement to CBSSports.com's Ken Berger through a team spokesman. The Chicago Tribune reports that a source close to Rose said the question was phrased differently than was presented in the article. Here's more from CBSSports.com's Ken Berger, including thoughts from Miami Heat All-Star guard Dwyane Wade and an official statement from Rose released Sunday afternoon.

Original Post:

The 2011 NBA MVP knows what he would like to see changed about the league.

In a survey of PED use in various sports in the May 16 issue of ESPN: The Magazine, Chicago Bulls point guard Derrick Rose was asked to rank its prevalance on a scale of 1-10, with one signifying "What are PEDs?" and 10 meaning "Everybody's juicing!"

Rose's response: "Seven. It's huge and I think we need a level playing field, where nobody has that advantage over the next person."

By comparison, James Laurinaitis of the NFL's St. Louis Rams also ranked his league's problem with PEDs a 7. The only sports to receive higher rankings from their representatives: Boxing (10) and MMA (8). MLB was ranked a 5.

While PEDs have been an ongoing black mark for both the NFL and MLB, the NBA has largely avoided any controversy on the subject. Indeed, the general assumption has long been that NBA players would not resort to steroids or other performance enhancers because they need agility and athleticism rather than raw power and bulk.

A major reason for that assumption has been the lack of players -- especially prominent players -- caught by the league's anti-drug program. Rose's statement appears to call into question that program, which includes testing for both illegal and performance-enhancing drugs.

Its two biggest catches: back in August 2009, then Orlando Magic forward Rashard Lewis was suspended 10 games for PEDs. In January 2011, Memphis Grizzlies guard O.J. Mayo suffered a similar fate.

But if the current policy isn't producing a "level playing field," what is it doing? If the league's strongest point guard -- a player who can get to the rim against every team in the league and who has a lot to lose by speaking his mind -- feels like things are unfair, this is potentially a very serious problem, right?

Hat tip: IamaGM.com
Posted on: May 17, 2011 11:23 am
 

Grizzlies owner: No plans for Rudy Gay trade

Memphis Grizzlies owner Michael Heisley says the team has no plans to move forward Rudy Gay. Posted by Ben Golliver. rudy-gay

After an unexpected and tantalizing run to the Western Conference semifinals, the Memphis Grizzlies were finally eliminated by the Oklahoma City Thunder in Game 7 on Sunday night. Most remarkable about Memphis' run is that it occurred without injured forward Rudy Gay, who was lost to a midseason shoulder injury.

That Memphis could not only continue to keep pace without Gay but actually win at a better clip -- the Grizzlies were 30-24 with Gay, 16-10 without him -- had led some to wonder whether they might be better off moving him to acquire multiple assets.

On Tuesday, the Memphis Commercial-Appeal reported that Grizzlies owner Michael Heisley shot down this idea.
Heisley emphatically put to rest rumors that he would be interested in dealing Gay this summer. "He is definitely a major part of this organization's future," Heisley said. "We have no plans whatsoever to trade him."
Heisley went on to say that Gay was missed during the series against the Oklahoma City Thunder and that, with him in place, the Grizzlies might have advanced to the Western Conferece finals.
If the Griz weren't the league's fourth-worst 3-point shooting team and had Gay then "it would have turned out differently," insisted Heisley.
The Grizzlies have locked Gay, Mike Conley and Zach Randolph into expensive long-term contracts and will need to pay big to keep center Marc Gasol, who is a restricted free agent, this summer. That's where a lot of the trade chatter is coming from: a base-level skepticism that a small market team will commit a huge chunk of change to four different players over multiple years.

The other cause for these rumors is the renewed play of Randolph, who embraced the No. 1 option role during the playoff stretch, playing arguably the best basketball of his career. Both Gay (16.1 per game) and Randolph (15.8 per game) need their shots, and there's some question whether they are an ideal match as a 1-2 option.

In the immediate future, the Grizzlies would be foolish to break up their core four, a well-balanced group that offers rebounding, low-post scoring, perimeter scoring and leadership. If a roster piece is expendable, it's guard O.J. Mayo who, indeed, was almost traded at the deadline.

With the San Antonio Spurs and Los Angeles Lakers falling by the wayside a bit, and a bunch of key Dallas Mavericks getting closer to retirement by the day, the Grizzlies are well-positioned to be a player in the Western Conference playoffs for the next three or four seasons. Sure, it will cost Heisley tens of millions of dollars to keep Randolph, Gay, Conley and Gasol, but I suspect the thrill of defeating the Spurs in the first round was priceless.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com