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Tag:Dirk Nowitzki
Posted on: October 13, 2011 2:41 pm
Edited on: October 13, 2011 2:41 pm
 

What players are losing the most in a lockout?

Posted by Royce Young

The whole strategy for owners in cancelling games is to make players miss paychecks. Maybe them miss out on collecting their large lump sums of money and ideally, you force them into taking a less than attractive deal.

That's the plan, at least.

The question is, how much will players be losing exactly by missing paychecks? We already know it's something like $80 million collectively per week, but who's taking the hit in their wallet the most? The Post Game did some crunching and here are your top 10 losers in this lockout.

10. Joe Johnson: $1,387,582.54 per paycheck
9. Amar'e Stoudemire: $1,401,361.92 per paycheck
8. Carmelo Anthony: $1,423,076.92 per paycheck
7. Pau Gasol: $1,439,550 per paycheck
6. Dirk Nowitzki: $1,468,682.54 per paycheck
5. Gilbert Arenas: $1,482,254.46 per paycheck
4. Kevin Garnett: $1,630,769.23 per paycheck
3. Tim Duncan $1,638,461.54 per paycheck
2. Rashard Lewis: $1,704,000 per paycheck
1. Kobe Bryant: $1,941,846.15 per paycheck

How did they arrive at those numbers. Here's the explanation:
Methodology: During the 1998-99 lockout, players lost pay based upon games missed. So, if a player missed one game due to the lockout, it would have cost him 1/82nd of his salary. However, since all players have slightly different schedules, we calculated pay on a paycheck basis.

Players are only paid during the regular season and receive checks bi-weekly for work that occurs the previous two weeks. The 2011-12 NBA season was supposed to have started on Nov. 1 and end on April 18. During the course of the season, that can be divided into 13 bi-weekly paychecks. The numbers were calculated by equally dividing each player's 2011-12 salary 13 times to find what they earn every two weeks during the season.

It shouldn't surprise you that Kobe is losing the most per paycheck in a lockout as he's the highest paid player in the league And the crazy thing about Kobe losing nearly $2 million per paycheck missed during the lockout is that he can recover that by playing one little exhibition game in Italy.

But it's always strange to see Rashard Lewis' name atop any of these type of lists. Yeah, I know he signed a massively ridiculous six-year $118 million deal a few years ago, but the fact he's second on this list blows the mind.

I know it's not big news to know that NBA players are going to lose a lot of money by missing paychecks, but it kind of stunned me just how much when broken down like this. I mean, think about two months missed for someone like Dirk. That's a whole lot of cash. Everyone says the players that will end up folding are the mid-level guys that make substantially less. I'm sure they will. But if I'm Tim Duncan or Kevin Garnett, I'm not exactly excited about losing $1.5 million or so every couple weeks.
Posted on: October 3, 2011 1:06 pm
 

Dirk defends Tony Romo

Posted by Royce Young

Dallas is the type of sports town where the spotlight is brighter than most other places. Especially if you're not doing well.

Succeed, and you'll get to reap all the benefits. Fail, and, well, then you're Tony Romo.

Dirk Nowitzki has played in Dallas for more than a decade and while he's never experienced anything close to the constant criticism Romo gets, he's definitely familiar with the feeling of the town. He gets the pulse. And amidst the latest batch of fire being thrown Romo's way after a three interception performance Sunday, The Big German decided to stick up for his fellow Texan.


Dirk definitely had some critics and now as a champion, he can kick back and bask in the light of his trophy. A championship is like the immunity idol in "Survivor." At least for a while. You're able to kind of give your critics the finger while you tell everyone how you proved them wrong.

But come on Dirk. What you heard is nothing like what Tony Romo is getting. Nobody ever genuinely wanted the Mavericks to bench or trade Dirk. No one ever thought it would be best to part ways with him. It was always just about how Dirk couldn't win big and that was pretty much it. No doubt, he heard the chatter and had plenty of it. But Romo's on another planet in terms of that.

And worst of all, it lives week to week. When Romo plays through broken ribs and wins a big game, he's a hero. When he throws a couple picks and blows a lead, he's a total goat. For Dirk he validated himself with a heroic postseason. Romo can absolutely do the same thing. And Dirk's right -- you just have to keep plugging.
Posted on: August 30, 2011 3:11 pm
Edited on: August 30, 2011 4:03 pm
 

EuroBasket preview: Spain and then everybody else

Posted by Royce Young



Actual competitive basketball being played in an actual arena with actual NBA players! No, this isn't another Drew League versus Goodman League showdown -- it's better. It's Eurobasket 2011 and if you're completely starved for some quality hoops, then welcome your all-you-can-eat buffet of basketball.

You're probably sick of people trying to convince you how quality the European game has become, and while no, it's not the NBA, it is about as good of basketball as you're going to get. And with the labor negotiations going about as well as Charles Barkley in a marathon, this might be one of your last chances to get competitive basketball.

The EuroBasket tournament features 24 countries all with the opportunity to put away an automatic bid to the 2012 Olympics in London. The top two finishers get an automatic bid while four bids to the Pre-Olympic qualifying tournament (for third through sixth) are at stake as well. But it's not only about the Olympic bids. It's about taking home a title for your country against the top competition in Europe. It's a big deal.

It starts up Aug. 31 and runs through Sept. 18. It's going to be a frantic few weeks of hoops with big names like Pau Gasol, Dirk Nowitzki, Luol Deng and Tony Parker. Let's take a look at the field.

Group A: Britain, Lithuania, Poland, Spain, Turkey, Portugal
Group B: France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Latvia, Serbia
Group C: Bosnia, Croatia, Greece, Macedonia, Montenegro, Finland
Group D: Belgium, Bulgaria, Georgia, Russia, Slovenia, Ukraine

(A heads up: Every game of EuroBasket can be watched free on ESPN3.com.)

THE FAVORITES

Spain -- Pau Gasol. Serge Ibaka. Ricky Rubio. Jose Calderon. Rudy Fernandez. Marc Gasol. If you're looking for your NBA fix, the Spaniards are your team to watch. They're going to play the most fluid, flashy game of anything and with players like Ibaka, Gasol and Rubio, will blend athleticism and skill together nicely.

It's really Spain's tournament to lose. There's just so much talent on the team, not even including the big names. Sergio Llull, recent first round draft pick Nikola Mirotic and the irresistible Juan Carlos Navarro make Spain the can't-miss team and clear-cut favorite.

NBA players: Pau Gasol (Lakers), Serge Ibaka (Thunder), Ricky Rubio (Timberwolves), Jose Calderon (Raptors), Rudy Fernandez (Mavericks), Marc Gasol (Grizzlies)

Lithuania
-- The Lithuanians are sort of a borderline favorite, but they are playing the tournament in their home country, so that's an advantage. Plus, there's talent scattered throughout the team with players like lottery pick Jonas Valanciunas, Donatas Motiejunas and Sarunas Jasikevicius.

NBA players: Jonas Valanciunas (Raptors), Donatas Motiejunas (Timberwolves)

France
-- Quietly, the French have assembled a pretty stellar team. Most aren't listing them as a top tier favorite, but it's hard to ignore the talent. A core of Nicolas Batum, Joakim Noah and Tony Parker make them a squad strong enough to consider. Add in Rodrigue Beaubois (if he's healthy), Kevin Seraphin, Mickael Pietrus and Kevin Seraphin and that's a quality rotation of players.

They don't have the same level of talent as Spain, but if Batum can emerge as a go-to scorer to supplement Parker, the French team could make noise in the knockout rounds.

NBA players: Tony Parker (Spurs), Nicolas Batum (Trail Blazers), Mickael Pietrus (Suns), Joakim Noah (Bulls), Rodrigue Beaubois (Mavericks), Kevin Seraphin (Wizards), Ronny Turiaf, injured though (Knicks), Ian Mahinmi (Mavericks), Boris Diaw (Bobcats)

Serbia -- One of Europe's most consistent powers, Serbia features a smooth balance of interior scorers and outside shooters. Nenad Krstic is the anchor but don't underestimate players like Milos Teodosic and Milenko Tepic. Serbia doesn't have anything all that flashy, but it's a team that's stayed together for a while and knows how to play extremely well with each other.

NBA players: None

THE DARK HORSES

Germany -- They have Dirk. That's enough to at least warrant consideration. Now after that it doesn't look extremely strong, but it's Dirk and if we learned anything, the dude can play in big moments. He can carry a team that otherwise looks like a batch of just mid-level players to a higher place and win with them. So I'm not doubting him one bit in this tournament.

Plus there's Chris Kaman and Thunder property Tibor Pleiss there with him, which gives Germany a pretty formidable front court.

NBA players: Dirk Nowitzki (Mavericks), Chris Kaman (Clippers)

Russia -- One thing that constantly intrigues me with the Russian team is coach David Blatt. He's an American coach that played for Pete Carril at Princeton and has been extremely successful overseas with major clubs. The team has some talent, but nothing to get too excited about. It would take a breakout tournament from Timofey Mozgov or swingman Victor Khryapa a huge showing from Andrei Kirilenko for them to truly contend, but they could be medal contenders.

NBA players: Timofey Mozgov (Nuggets), Andrei Kirilenko (Jazz)

Slovenia -- Slovenia's the Atlanta Hawks of Europe. Always solid, never good enough to win. They have some quality players, but lack enough quality size to compete with Spain, Lithuania or France.

NBA players: Goran Dragic (Rockets)

Turkey
-- Last year's World Championship runners-up to the United States, Turkey has most of that team back. It's a good group and one that could certainly get hot and make a run again, but the World Championship run came largely because of a huge bump from a home court advantage. Not happening again in Lithuania.

NBA players: Semih Erden (Celtics), Omer Asik (Bulls), Ersan Ilyasova (Bucks), Enes Kanter (Jazz), Hedo Turkoglu (Magic)

THE MIDDLE GROUND

Greece -- When their fluid passing is leading to open 3s (which they make), the Greeks are a problem for people. But when they're missing, they're a team easy to run over. They're scrappy and will claw on each possession, but reality is, they just don't have enough talent to hang with the bigger clubs. They do have one of the funner players to watch in Dimitrios Diamantidis, so keep an eye on him.

NBA players: Kostas Koufos (Nuggets)

Croatia -- Much like Slovenia, Croatia is a squad that is always in the conversation, but lacks the firepower to truly contend. Hard to figure where the points will come from for them in big spots. They'll be good enough to likely win Group C, but after that, it'll be a tough road to advance.

NBA players: Bojan Bogdanovic (Nets)

Great Britain
-- I'm intrigued by this British team despite it not having any depth whatsoever. Had Ben Gordon been cleared to play, the Brits would've had a dark horse caliber team. Instead, they'll have to fight to get out of group play. Luol Deng is good enough to carry them some with Joel Freeland and Ryan Richards potentially adding some scoring pop from inside.

Don't worry though: They've already qualified for the 2012 Olympics. Because, you know, they're hosting it.

NBA players: Luol Deng (Bulls)

Italy -- There's a little something to the Italian team. Danillo Gallinari, Marco Belinelli and Andrea Bargnani give them some scoring. Problem is, can they stop anyone? It's a decent team and one that can probably make the knockout round, but not much after that.

NBA players: Danillo Gallinari (Nuggets), Marco Belinelli (Hornets), Andrea Bargnani (Raptors)

Montenegro -- Not a powerful team but one with some consistent shooters and a couple decent interior players. Montenegro could very well be every bit as good as Slovenia or Croatia, but their roster doesn't strike you as anything special.

NBA players: Nikola Vucevic (76ers), Nikola Pekovic (Timberwolves)

THE NO CHANCES

Belgium
NBA players: None

Israel
NBA players: Omri Casspi (Cavaliers) -- Casspi's unlikely though because of injury

Bosnia
NBA players: None

Macedonia
NBA players: None

Georgia
NBA players: Zaza Pachulia (Hawks)

Ukraine
NBA players: Kyrylo Fesenko (Jazz),

THE BLOWOUT FODDER

Poland

NBA players: None

Finland
NBA players: None

Portugal
NBA players: None

Latvia
NBA players: None

Bulgaria
NBA players: None

PREDICTION: If Spain doesn't reach the final, it's a massive disappointment and a massive shock. It's really just a matter of who will challenge the loaded Spaniards. I see the final four teams being Spain, France, Lithuania and a dark horse in Germany. A lot of people aren't necessarily on the French bandwagon, but I see a team with a bunch of talent that could possibly put together a little run. The safe bet is to go with a Spain-Lithuania final (this of course assuming the teams match up correctly in the knockout round), but I'm looking at France to fall to Spain in the gold medal game but still earn that automatic bid to London in 2012.
Posted on: August 23, 2011 8:44 am
Edited on: August 23, 2011 12:50 pm
 

The EOB Elite 100, 1-5: Best of the best



By Matt Moore


This is the final segment of the CBSSports.com Eye on Basketball Elite 100, counting down the top-100 players in the NBA. The goal was to create the best ranking of players based on total value, which comprises everything from respect and status to upside to statistical production and intangibles. All three of our NBA bloggers ranked every player, then we took the average to determine our ranking.

Check out the earlier installments: 100-91 | 90-81 | 80-71 | 70-61 | 60-51 | 50-41 | 40-31 | 30-21 | 20-11 | 10-6

We've come to the end, my friends. 

What we discovered while making this list is that the NBA has such remarkable athletes, that the gap between one to the next is quite small. There are no clear dividing lines. You make the best estimation off of overall value, take the aggregate, and may the basketball gods have mercy on your soul. You look at every player near the top and say, "that's got to be too low," until you look at the players above him. Then you begrudgingly move on to those players who you feel much the same about. We're blessed with incredible players in this league, versatile and extremely talented. Our attempt in ranking them wasn't perfect, and the best aspect is finding out your thoughts.

No one's going to agree on these lists completely. For every item you find accurate, there will be 10 you disagree with. And we're betting our top spot will neither surprise you nor please you. But, after watching these players night in and night out, this is the top of the chart in comparison to all others. It's been fun figuring out who goes where, even if it kept us up nights. And we promise we'll keep watching and working to figure it out every night to come. 

You know, once we have a season again.

Here now are the top five players in the NBA in overall value according to the EOB Elite 100.

5. Derrick Rose, PG, age 22, Chicago Bulls
2011 stats: 25.0 ppg, 4.1 rpg, 7.7 apg, 1.0 spg, .6 bpg, 44.5 FG percentage, 23.5 PER
Composite rankings (random order): 5, 5, 4

What I love about Rose ending up here is that he's simultaneously too low and too high and both arguments are valid. He's the reigning MVP. His team secured the top spot in the playoffs overall and won the most regular-season games. He led the Bulls to the Eastern Conference Finals. Rose is young, brilliant, explosive, and seems to improve with every game. He's also inefficient at times, both in shooting percentage and turnovers. He's got great assist numbers and yet never blows you away with his passing game. He has elite speed and tremendous finishing ability, but his mid-range jumper is a work in progress and his 3-point shot, which improved considerably in 2010-11, is wildly inconsistent. He'll shoot 70 percent from the arc one game and go 1 of 5 the next. The end result is a career-best percentage that could go way up if he manages to stabilize it. 

Rose is an elite player in this league, but ... 1: We haven't seen MVP-level play from him beyond this season, and those above him have been at it for years; 2: His postseason struggles, particularly against the Heat stick with us. The problems did go beyond the Heat series, however. Rose had a 35.2 usage rate in the playoffs, which is astronomical (and he had to; have you seen Carlos Boozer?) yet only had a 43 effective field goal percentage. The way the Heat were able to adjust to solve him lingers, despite a stellar 2011 campaign. 

What Rose did stands out. I described Chris Paul as the best pure point guard in the league earlier, and I still believe him to be the best point guard. But that's because Rose isn't a point guard by any traditional sense. He's not even really a point guard by any advanced metric. This isn't to say he can't do what point guards do. He does, and quite well. It's that Rose is so prolific in his game, that he extends beyond the traditional position evaluations. I'm fond of saying, "Rose isn't a point guard, he's not a shooting guard, he's not even really a guard. He's Derrick Rose." His versatility and explosiveness are so unmatched, his specific style and approach so unique, he extends beyond the traditional models and establishes himself as his own entity. Even if that entity sometimes shows hiccups we saw in the ECF. 

Don't get too upset, Bulls fans. This ranking definitely hides the fact that our committee definitely believes that this will be the last time Rose is this low, and that his shot at the top spot next year is as strong as anyone's. And yet any drop-off from his tremendous season would be a huge letdown. This is the top of the NBA, where Rose belongs, and all of these factors make up the reasons why at No. 5. He's at once too low and too high for anyone and everyone. Say hello to Derrick Rose, the NBA's newest most-polarizing player. -- MM

4. Dwyane Wade, SG, 29, Miami Heat
2011 stats: 25.4 ppg, 6.4 rpg, 4.6 apg, 50 FG percentage, 30.6 3-point percentage, 25.65 PER
Composite rankings (random order): 4, 5, 4

Most of the talk about the Miami Heat has centered around LeBron James. He's the lightning rod, the controversial figure, the talking point. But here's what should tell you that Dwyane Wade still is entirely legit: The Heat are still his team. LeBron may generate most of the chatter, but the Heat just feel like Wade's team.

Wade sometimes is forgotten as a superstar for reasons I don't exactly know, but he's a champion, a Finals MVP, an elite defender and a top-tier scorer. His production may have dipped a bit because he's sharing duties with LeBron and Chris Bosh, but don't forget he averaged 30.2 points a game on nearly 50 percent shooting in 2008-09. Don't forget that he's averaging 6.3 assists a game for his career with two seasons of 7.5 a game. In fact, don't forget that for his career, he goes 25-6-5.

Wade is 29 though, and he's had a few major injuries and surgeries so he might start trending down in the next few seasons. He's the type of player that plays so hard he's borderline reckless. Eventually the wear and tear is going to slow him down. But he's still elite because he's a complete player. You may think of LeBron first when someone brings up the Heat but it's Wade's team and that's not changing. -- RY

3. Dirk Nowitzki, F, 33, Dallas Mavericks
2011 Stats: 23.0 points, 7.0 rebounds, 2.6 assists, 51.7 FG percentage 23.52 PER
Composite rankings (random order): 5, 2, 3

We’ve arrived at the pinnacle of Nowitzki’s NBA career, a summit from which the German forward triumphantly holds up the Larry O’Brien and his NBA Finals MVP trophies and looks down upon all the critics who said he was too “soft” and not wired to be a No. 1 option on a title-winning team. The Mavericks were somewhat improbable champions and nobody benefited from their victory more -- at least from a perception standpoint -- than Nowitzki, whose unbelievable scoring efficiency and unmatched ability to hit off-balance shots stole the show during the 2011 playoffs.

Bracketed by Shawn Marion and Tyson Chandler, it didn’t much matter that Nowitzki still isn't an All-NBA defender and never will be. He performed capably in man-to-man or zone looks, but his overall offensive game was his ace in the hole; nobody could stop him when he needed to get a bucket in the postseason. Nowitzki wasn't only a weapon when he's leaning back and falling away, uncorking a jumper at an impossible angle. He’s agile enough, even at his size, to take most NBA bigs off the dribble and he can finish around the rim in a variety of creative ways, usually more smooth rather than emphatic. He commands constant attention and is a surgeon when it comes to picking apart weak, early or late help defense, equally adept at threading the needle to cutters or throwing on-the-money skip passes. He can shoot with range, from a stop or on the move; he can set picks and find his spots. Despite the spotlight, he’s still an underrated rebounder. And, please, don’t leave out his ability to pump fake to draw fouls and to convert his free throws at a ridiculous 89.2 percent.

Put simply, Nowitzki is so good on offense that he we’ve ranked him ahead of all but the very best two-way players in the league. Not too shabby for a soft, choking European who is afraid to play down low. -- BG

2. Dwight Howard, C, 25, Orlando Magic 2011 stats: 22.9 ppg, 14.1 rpg, 2.4 bpg, 59.3 FG percentage 26.13 PER Composite rankings (random order): 2, 2, 3

There's one question to ask yourself when decided where you want to place Dwight Howard: How much do you value defense? Do you see it as the downtime in between offensive possessions (aka the Don Nelson philosophy) or do you see it as an equally important part to the game as offense, and in some cases more important?

The way you lean there tells you what to do with Howard, because he's the league's best defensive player and it's not especially close. He's won three straight Defensive Player of the Year awards and it's not only because he blocks shots and grabs a lot of rebounds. It's really about the shots he doesn't block. Officials stats don't keep track of altered shots or probably better, non-attempted shots that might've been taken had Howard not been looming in the lane. But I can guarantee you Howard leads the league in both those categories and it's not close. He changes every game, and does it just by being on the floor.

That makes it sound like he's one dimensional, which isn't accurate. He's not a dynamic offensive player. He scores in brutish ways -- alley-oops, put-backs, easy baskets. He gets it done with little finesse and without a go-to shot. But however it happens, he still averaged 22.9 points a game last year and shot an outstanding 59 percent from the field. He's getting better offensively and at only 25, he still has some space to grow.

If Howard's offense ever catches up to his defense, he'd make a realistic push at the top spot on this list. In terms of how much a game is impacted per night, Howard is king. His win shares are ridiculous (14.4) and his PER is outstanding (26.13). Pretty much any way you want to measure Howard, he lives up. And that's without being as good as he really could be on one end.  Now that's scary. 

1. LeBron James, SF, 26, Miami Heat
2011 stats: 26.7 ppg, 7.5 rpg, 7.0 apg, 1.6 spg, .6 bpg, 51.0 FG percentage, 27.3 PER
Composite rankings (unanimous): 1, 1, 1

Thoughts from all three of our panel members on the top player in the NBA.

Matt Moore: You probably don't like this. That's OK. We don't like it much, either. LeBron James has showed an arrogance in the past year since The Decision that is so excessive the only way to defend it is to claim that all athletes are arrogant. Even then, it's the matter of degree that gets James in trouble. James never seems to say the right thing, never seems to take the right approach, never seems to put himself in the best light. This is a stunning change from four years ago when he was basically a shadow on the wall that sold shoes. It's a year after The Decision and we saw the best and worst of James. He continued to show the versatility that in large part puts him in this spot. His team made the Finals, and was two games away from a title, as they should have been with all that talent. And yet we saw James "shrink" or "choke" or whatever hyper-dramatic interpretation you prefer. There's no getting around the idea of whether you believe in "clutch" or not, James was not there when his team needed him most. That's pretty damning stuff. 

So how did he not only wind up as the top player, but the unanimous one?

Because he's better. Kobe Bryant's age is starting to affect him along with numerous injuries that have slowed him. Dirk Nowitzki is getting older and doesn't have the defensive impact James does (James remains an underrated individual and help defender, which is saying something considering how lauded he rightfully is for it). Rose is still learning to be efficient from everywhere on the floor and to be a better defender. Howard's still growing into his complete offensive game. For James, nothing he does is beyond reason anymore. A 40-point triple-double is conceivable from him (though not on this Heat team barring injuries because of usage). He can make the chase-down block at one end, lob a perfect outlet pass, then recover and jam home an alley-oop after leaving from mid-wing. He can pull-up and nail the mid-range jumper, even as that part of his game is at both still developing and something he turns to far too often. He can hit from the perimeter (ask the Celtics if you don't believe me) and bulldoze his way to the rim to draw the foul (ask the Bulls if you don't believe me). He's a one-man tour de force, able to cover the entire floor, able to play at any position, able to do more than any other player in the league. 

That's why he's No.1. Like it or not.

Royce Young: It's kind of a relief that we don't have to have the debate anymore. No longer is it "Kobe or LeBron?" No longer is it a question as to who the league's best player is. We all know. It's LeBron, whether you like it or not. 

You can try and talk yourself into someone else. You can try and single out LeBron's failures, his faults and his issues. You can try and point out his curious choke job in The Finals. You can try and devalue him simply because you don't like him. That's all fine. But you can't deny that he's the best player in basketball. He just is.  Even trying to fit in alongside two other All-Stars in Miami LeBron put out an incredible season. He still led the league in PER (again), still went for 26-7-7 and still was the single most dangerous player on the floor every night. And before you say, "Oh yeah, well people prove things in the playoffs and LeBron failed!" That's true, but only to a degree. Remember how he handcuffed Derrick Rose for the last two games of the Eastern Finals? Remember how he destroyed the Bulls in leading an incredible Game 5 comeback? Remember how he and Wade worked perfectly in concert in Game 1 of The Finals? It's easy to just forget all the good stuff because of how it all finished. But LeBron didn't completely lay an egg. He just did so in the last three games. Doesn't mean he's not still the best player in the game.  

Ben Golliver:2010-2011 was a boastful, bewildering season for James, who arrived in Miami with unprecedented hype and expectations, only to crash and burn in the NBA Finals as soon as his first title was within reach. The on-court imperfections are clearly established at this point: a difficulty impacting the offense without the ball in his hands, an erratic jump shot, and the occasional tendency to tighten up when the stakes are highest. The off-court annoyances are equally obvious: a lack of self-awareness, a massive ego, and an inability to relate to the common man or to productively process criticism.

Still, judging James or his season solely on his meltdown in the final three games of the NBA Finals would be a huge mistake. Zooming out to view the entire year, he was spectacular as always statistically, posting the top PER in the league despite the fact that he was getting acclimated to an entirely new set of teammates and a new way of sharing top dog priorities with Dwyane Wade. He was a menace defensively, sending the aging Boston Celtics into the past during the second round of the Eastern Conference playoffs and swallowing NBA MVP Derrick Rose whole in the Eastern Conference Finals. James remains the NBA’s best and most versatile athlete and saw time at four -- if not five -- positions for the Heat this season. There’s not a player in the league who can guard him one-on-one and there's not really anyone that he couldn’t defend at least passably.

Even for his critics, who were rightfully gleeful when things fell apart against the Dallas Mavericks, there must be a sense that this was as tough as it will get for James, that the perfect storm of hatred and disgust that followed The Decision will eventually dissipate, leaving James to finally assume the throne he clearly believes belongs to him.

Posted on: August 4, 2011 5:13 pm
 

Dirk Nowitzki to delay decision on next season

Posted by Ben Golliver

dirk-nowitzki

World champions get to set their own schedules.

Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki, fresh off his first NBA title, is in no hurry to set his plans should the ongoing NBA lockout result in a work stoppage.

ESPNDallas.com reports that Nowitzki, who carried the Mavericks past the Miami Heat in the 2011 NBA Finals, is taking his time to make his plans for next season despite the fact that he's drawing interest from around the world.
Spending the week in Berlin to combine a commercial shoot with private training sessions with longtime mentor Holger Geschwindner, Nowitzki said: "I'm going to play the Euros and then see where the lockout is after that. Until then, I'm not going to look at playing anywhere else."

"I've always said I'm too old to sit around for a whole year," Nowitzki said. He turned 33 a week after the Mavs' title-clinching Game 6 win in Miami. "I still can't see this being a long lockout, but if it is I'm going to find somewhere to play."

The report also notes that German club Bayern Munich has "been chasing Nowitzki for months" and that a Chinese club has offered "more than $1 million per month" to obtain his services.

The Euros that Nowitzki is referring to is the EuroBasket tournament that runs later this month and into September. Nowitzki has committed to representing his native Germany. 

Nowitzki's stance about playing overseas is an interesting one. He's the Mavericks' clear franchise player and has more than $60 million coming to him over the next three seasons. With that said, he's banked more than $140 million over the course of his career according to Basketball-Reference.com so, assuming he was able to protect most of that from his ex-fiancee, he is in a position where he can put basketball first. Nowitzki has always played with a free-flowing love of the game that's unusual for a player of his size. Perhaps we shouldn't be surprised that he so adamently opposes losing a season's worth of games. Retirement is approaching, sure, but it sounds like he's at the point where he wants to squeeze every last ounce of joy out of playing the game.

In this way, Nowitzki sounds like a less commercialized version of Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, who has also made it clear he doesn't want to sit around and that his talents are available to the highest bidder.

Nowitzki dealt with a finger injury and a knee injury last season so the idea of him playing overseas surely doesn't sit easy with Mavericks ower Mark Cuban or the team's fanbase. But imagine the fanfare if Nowitzki did return to Europe, even for a brief run, so soon after his NBA Finals win. It would be the stuff of legend. 

Now we just sit and wait to see if it will happen.
Posted on: August 1, 2011 4:14 pm
Edited on: August 1, 2011 4:22 pm
 

Report: David Stern earns salary of $20+ million?

Posted by Ben Golliver. 

david-stern

Those cufflinks could be made of solid gold, the cuffs constructed from the finest ivory. 

Yahoo! Sports reports that NBA commissioner David Stern could make more in salary than all but a handful of the league's players.
Many owners don’t even know what Stern makes. “I’d say three or less know,” one NBA owner told Yahoo! Sports. Several believe it’s somewhere in the range of $20 million to $23 million a year, but no one knows for sure. Maybe it’s more than that, but the fact that some owners don’t know the answer is beyond belief.
That salary ballpark squares with a New York Daily News report from February -- noted by CBSSports.com's Matt Moore in a piece on the league's opulent culture -- which pegged Stern's salary at $23 million.

Only one NBA player is set to make more than $25 million during the 2011-2012 season: Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, who is on the books for $25.2 million.  

Only three other players are set to make more than $20 million: Boston Celtics forward Kevin Garnett ($21.2 million), San Antonio Spurs forward Tim Duncan ($21.2 million) and Washington Wizards forward Rashard Lewis ($21.1 million). 

Stern is reportedly set to bring home more bacon than the league's worst contracts: Orlando Magic guard Gilbert Arenas ($19.3 million) and Phoenix Suns guard Vince Carter ($18.9 million, although only a fraction of that is guaranteed). He will also reportedly make more than most of the league's biggest stars, including Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki ($19.1 million), Los Angeles Lakers forward Pau Gasol ($18.7 million), New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony ($18.5 million) and Amar'e Stoudemire ($18.2 million), Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard ($18.1 million) and all three of the Miami Heat's Big 3 of LeBron James ($16.0 million), Dwyane Wade ($15.7 million) and Chris Bosh ($16.0 million).

Two pieces of information worth pointing out. First, Stern has held the commissioner title since 1984, so he's had more than two and a half decades to rack up pay raises. There's a very good chance he is the league's highest-paid employee by leaps and bounds. Second, Stern pledged not to accept any salary in the event of a work stoppage at the 2011 All-Star Weekend in Los Angeles.
Stern was asked whether he would reduce his salary to $1 if the two sides could not reach a labor agreement, as NFL commissioner Roger Goodell has pledged recently. Stern said: "Last time, I ddin't take any salary. I think a dollar would be too high in the event of a work stoppage." 
Still, that seems like an awful lot of money for the league's chief executive. Windfall salaries for chief executives in many industries are often tied to periods of peak company performance. The NBA, though, claims never to have had a positive operating income during the duration of the last Collective Bargaining Agreement. 
Posted on: July 30, 2011 5:25 pm
 

Legend vs. Star: Larry Bird vs. Dirk Nowitzki



By Matt Moore


We live in an immediate society. The internet, social media, the ever-accelerating news cycle, everything means that the next 30 seconds is 10 times more important than the last 30 seconds regardless of what actually happened in the past 30 seconds. As a result, we lose perspective on what stands truly relevant from the past. The NBA is no exception. So in an attempt to merge the two worlds (since, as a blog, we love/hate/want to be BFFs within the next 30 seconds), we'll be bringing you a look at players past and present, in relation to one another.

This is important enough, we're going to bold it. Legend Vs. Star is not meant to necessarily decide who was "better." You're talking about different eras, with different rules, with fewer teams. The objective here is to discuss the two and how they're alike and dissimilar. It's an exercise in exploration of the present through the context of the past and vice versa. Or to put it another way, no need to flood the comments with "Whatever! (Player X) was/is way better than (Player Y), there's no comparison!" Since they're both basketball players who played in the same basketball league, I'm pretty sure you can make the comparison.

This week we explore the belief of 2011 NBA Champion head coach Rick Carlisle of the two greatest players he's ever shared a team with, Dirk Nowitzki and Larry Bird.

There's a dichotomy that exists in public knowledge and awareness of Larry Bird. Because Bird was born into an NBA with a significant problem around television contracts and because of the stunning fame he entered into as a revelation on the floor, Bird is very different in the eyes of those who watched him on a daily basis and in the lore his name has become synonomous with. This isn't to say one is greater than the other. Both versions of Bird are equally heralded as belonging to the greatest players of all time, even if they're conceptualized differently.

If Jordan was idolized the way a great political leader is, with posters and video propoganda and a crushing history of success, and if Magic Johnson is glorified the way movie stars are, with the perfect picture magazine covers and the walk of fame, Bird is more folk tale. He's spoken of in terms that are general. It's not any one area that's discussed, it's his overall greatness. He overwhelmed the game. The idea of Bird is not so different than an army of Birds always on the floor. Always making the perfect pass. Always hitting the clutch shot. Stealing the ball when there is no logical reason for him to be able to steal the ball. Hitting shots off the backboard, off the ceiling. The difference in that McDonalds commercial is you'd believe the idea of someone telling you Bird could hit a shot like that, and you'd believe seeing Jordan hit a shot like that. In reality, neither would surprise you, even if it's not physically possible.

In reality, Bird was a mega-forward with an intensity that couldn't be topped. That's the best way to describe him. He was capable of adjusting his game to nearly anything that was required. If he needed to rebound, he could snatch 20 in a game. If he needed to deliver the passes and be the all-around distributor, he did. And if he needed to light of the scoreboard like the Fourth of July, he did. Bird left his mark on every game whether the shot was there or not. In a lot of ways, LeBron James is more like him than any other player, except for Bird's ability to consistently hit from anywhere on the floor. He was a marksman shooter, a stud rebounder, a gifted passer. The crossover between the ideallic Bird and the actual Bird was the intensity and will to win that drove his play to resemble a one-man army. It was like Bird was everywhere on the floor at the same time. You weren't facing the five Celtics on the floor, you were facing four Celtics and five Celtic Birds, and you had to guard all of them. And worse still, they could all pass. 



Bird burned beneath the failures of not matching Magic Johnson right out of the gate after the 1980 Lakers championship, only to turn around and win his own first ring in 81 over the Rockets. Bird was defined by his rivalry with Johnson, and has never suffered the brutal examination current players are given when their rival winds up with more rings. Bird experienced a year of struggle, then success, then two years of frustration, then won the title again two out of three years. In essence, Bird burned not out of frustration and desperation for the elusive championship, but from some type of motor that inexhaustibly searched out glory. 

And then, we have Nowitzki.

When we look at the two players, race is most often brought up, as if that's the only comparison for two gangly players with unbelievable scoring ability who stayed with their franchise for the duration of their tenure. It's true that quite often the two players are compared solely on the basis of race, but instead, I was drawn to compare and contrast the two because of how strongly and how often Carlisle brought up Bird's name when discussing Nowitzki in the Finals. Carlisle was adamant, having played with Bird, that the two were comparable. Bird, when asked to comment, was his usual (publicly) humble self, saying it was an honor to be compared to Nowitzki. People took umbrage but largely missed the fact that Carlisle was in large part comparing their will to win, their passion, and their ability to rise to the moment. He referenced Bird when Nowitzki was dealing with a torn ligament in his hand in the Finals, talking about how the great players play through that kind of pain. There is a comparison there, a symmetry between the two, even if they are far from identical idenities on or off the floor. 

Bird experienced immediate and consistent success in his first seven years in the league. Nowitzki just won his first title in his 13th season. Bird was once and forever known as the toughest competitor, a downright mean son of a gun who would do whatever it took to win. Nowitzki had his toughness challenged until the past few years when it became apparent just how versatile he was. Nowitzki went from being a defensive liability to being underrated as a defender. And all the while, Nowitzki was the consummate leader who led the Mavericks to unparalleled success. Both are quiet men who don't brag but will quite willinglly let you know when they're victorious. Both want to win, like all the great ones do, but that doesn't make them unique. What makes them unique is their determination not only to win, but to win on their terms. Bird never left the Celtics, Nowitzki never left the Mavs. Loyal leadership is hard to come by in this league, and both men epitomized it. 

If it felt like Bird was a one-man army, an onslaught of different players cresting the hill to storm your team's gates, Nowitzki is the opposite. Nothing illustrated Dirk's on-floor identity of greatness like the 2011 playoff run, wherein it felt legitimately like Nowitzki could take on all five players at once. Double-teams, triple-teams, you name it, Dirk beat it, hitting the fadeaway time after time. Body him, zone him, swarm to him, delay the double, immediately bring the double, play him in space, front him, attack the pass, do whatever you want. Nowitzki had an answer. And that's been his whole career really. If Bird was constantly in feud with Magic Johnson, it was Dirk who wound up caught in a flurry of greatness. Bird had to topple Magic and Kareem, Dr. J and Moses. Once Jordan really found his footing, Bird's time had already passed. But Nowitzki? He suffered through the Shaq-Kobe mini-dynasty, played in the same division as Tim Duncan and Popovich's Spurs throughout the entirety of the last decade, faced the crushing defeat by the Heat in 2006, the bizarro meltdown in 2007, and the Lakers' resurgence behind Pau Gasol teamed with Bryant (along with Odom and Bynum). In short, if I were to tell you a few slight differences could have led to three or four titles for Nowitzki, you wouldn't be sympathetic (that's how these things go), but you wouldn't be surprised either. 

The career totals are fascinating. If we compare their career averages on a per-minute basis, we see that per 36 minutes, Bird averaged 22.8 points to Nowitzki's 22.6, 9.4 rebounds to Nowitzki's 8.3, 6.0 assists to Dirk's 2.3, 1.6 steals to Dirk's 0.9, and 2.9 turnovers to Dirk's 1.9. Perhaps most stunningly, for a player that is arguably the best pure offensive player of the past ten years, and at very worst in the top five, Nowitzki's .476 field goal percentage pales in comparison to Bird's .496. That's just a two percentage point differential, but it's the gap between a 50 percent career shooter and a 48 percent. That's a big deal in the NBA. I was surprised to find that after both players had logged 13 years in the league, Dirk has 233 more blocks than Bird. That's more indicative of Dirk's seven-foot stature and Bird's more perimeter-based role playing than anything, but still surprising considering the two players' reputations. Taken out of the per-minute ranges into the per-game averages, Bird has the clear upperhand, and while his career minutes average is nearly two minutes higher, it doesn't change the impact he had which was greater than Nowitzki in nearly every way. I shouldn't have to really tell you that Bird was a greater player in his time than Nowitzki, but for those who balk at the absence of a definitive and nearly dogmatic appraisal of the past as always better in order to protect a legacy that is untarnishable, there it is: Larry Bird was better than Dirk Nowitzki. 

Nowitzki's best single season: 24.6 with 8.9 rebounds on 50 percent shooting in 2006-2007. 

Bird's single best season (arguably, it's tough between '84 and 88'):  28.1 points and 9.2 rebounds on 53 percent shooting (from a forward on the perimeter) with 7.6 assists in 1986-1987.

Not too shabby either way, but the results are the same. 

Still, the two provide an interesting, if loose parallel, and an examination of what one player can mean to a franchise. They defined their teams in their eras, and will stand as two of the greatest the game has ever seen. 

And if you're ever looking to see what a truly great jump shot looks like? Just examine either one. It's less about mechanics and more about art and beauty, wrapped in daggers. 

 
Posted on: July 26, 2011 9:09 am
Edited on: July 26, 2011 9:10 am
 

Dirk's a marketing icon that doesn't market



By Matt Moore


Dirk Nowitzki isn't marketing his brand. He's not extending into new consumer base opportunities. He's not driving to become an opinion-maker. Dirk Nowitzki isn't focusing on becoming a global entity. He's just a basketball player. But it turns out, he's pretty much the most marketable and likeable star out there. From Yahoo! Sports:  
Nowitzki, a 10-time NBA All-Star, has an N-Score of 132, a whopping 59 percent higher than Kobe Bryant's 83.

The N-Score measures name and image awareness, appeal and personality attributes such as sincerity, approachability, experience and influence, both at the U.S. national and local levels.

Despite the Mavericks star's popularity, without an agent or business manager, the pride of Wurzburg, Germany, doesn't seem motivated in cashing in on his profit-making potential.
via King Dirk: The New Master Of NBA Marketability | ThePostGame.

It makes sense, when you think about it. Dirk's humble, which everyone at least pretends is what they want out of their star when they talk about LeBron James (and ignores when it's anyone else). He's a champion, a Hall of Famer. He's lovable and has a certain amount of swagger (the "I'm That Dude" shirt, etc.). He's able to make fun of himself and is clutch as all get out.

It's just stirring for a guy who was a German enigma for so long, for a player who people struggled to understand and called into question for his supposed lack of toughness for so long to have come this far. It's not just that Nowitzki has made it to the top. It's that it's been such a long uphill trek for him.

It's also pretty entertaining that perhaps what makes Dirk so marketable is that he's shown no inclination to market himself. That sums things up nicely.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com