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Tag:Jason Terry
Posted on: December 8, 2010 11:22 am
Edited on: December 8, 2010 11:36 am
 

Game Changer 12.8.10: Elbow trouble

Dirk and his elbow, surprising guards, and Monroe exists, all in today's Game Changer.  Posted by Matt Moore

Each game is made up of elements which help formulate the outcome. Monday through Friday, we'll bring you the elements from the night before's games in our own specialized version of the game recaps. It's not everything that happened, but it's an insight into what lead to the results you'll see in the box scores. This is the Game Changer.

THE BIG ONE: David Lee STILL HAS ELBOW PROBLEMS

While the Dallas bench was doing its thing , the Warriors managed to stay in this one with turnovers leading to fast breaks. Or, basically, your standard Warrior plan of attack. But when the Mavericks absolutely had to get buckets? They turned to Dirk Nowitzki. Either with his elbow, or at the elbow.

Example A:



What you'll notice here is that Nowitzki's able to create space with his shooting elbow, which is kind of insane. It's the post-fake that gets David Lee shook trying to recover, but on the step-back through, he brings that elbow up and through, with his forearm creating kind of a stone wall between Lee's recovery attempt and a block. Granted, Nowitzki being seven feet tall helps quite a bit, but that perfect elbow placement is part of it.

Example 2: 



And again, we see Nowitzki stepping back into Lee, freezing him. By the time Lee recognizes what's happening, Dirk's elbow is already in place, again, creating a barrier between he and Lee. You've got to body Nowitzki in order to defend it, and bodying Nowitzki means you're probably fouling him. This is why he's Dirk.

And finally, in crunch time:



Forget for a moment that Jason Terry successfully screens two Warriors defenders. When Nowitzki receives this pass, he's at that elbow sweet spot. But he doesn't have to disturb his placement at all when the pass comes in. The movement is one fluid process. Step out to receive the pass, catch the ball, swing the other leg back to square up, rise, and release.

Perfect.

You know what keeps Dirk Nowitzki as good as he is at 32? Precision. 

GO-GO-GADGET LINE OF THE NIGHT:

Josh Smith: 34 points on 14-16 shooting, 7 assists, 3 rebounds (weird), 1 steal, 2 blocks in 38 minutes.

Runners-Up:

Luis Scola: 35 points, 12 rebounds, 1 block

Pau Gasol: 21 points, 14 rebounds, 8 assists

WHAT YOU MISSED: 

SURPRISING GUARDS SURPRISING

Some underrated guards had a few nice games last night:
  • D.J. Augustin has developed a solid sense of when to pull up for a three. A lot of guards are unsure and are constantly trying to figure out when to shoot and when not to. Augustin though, has a good sense of when the defense is sagging and when the shot is in the flow of the offense. He doesn't leave his rebounders out to dry while they're trying to establish position. 
  • Kyle Lowry has been pretty ridiculous lately. His three-point shot, which has been pathetic until this season, has all of a sudden started dropping. His perimeter speed is creating a fair amount of steals and in transition he's becoming quite the guard. With Aaron Brooks on the shelf, the Rockets are getting back into contention, slowly but surely, because of Lowry's particular abilities. 
  • Devin Harris struggled with his shot last night, but he did manage to run the offense reasonably well. He understands Lopez better than any other player in the league and has an innate sense of where the offense runs. 

FINAL THOUGHTS:

Stephen Curry has a ridiculous set of fakes to his arsenal, particularly while on the move with the ball. He's got fakes within fakes within fakes. Last night he used about five of them on a baseline drive that absolutely froze Shawn Marion, allowing an easy reverse under the basket.

Greg Monroe is alive! 7 points, 3 rebounds, 2 steals, and 2 blocks for the young'n which isn't much, but he also looked more confident in 25 minutes against the Rockets. Good signs for a Pistons team that needs some element of hope.

Luis Scola has a remarkable ability to shoot directly from wherever he lands on an offensive rebound. He snares the ball, then goes right back up in a hook.
Posted on: December 8, 2010 2:22 am
Edited on: December 8, 2010 9:34 am
 

Mavericks breaking out with more than front five

Mavericks excel with more than the starting five, as their win streak reaches ten. Posted by Matt Moore



The Mavericks have always been able to gunsling with the best with them this decade. Having a seven-foot Hall of Fame, former MVP legend will do that for you, alongside one of the top point guards of all time and a former sixth man of the year. But as was evident in the Mavericks' tenth straight win , it's not just the starters for Dallas that are getting the job done. 

After the Mavericks outran the Jazz on December 3rd, Dirk Nowitzki said this is the deepest team he's been on . The numbers are bearing out that this is at least a very good team depth-wise, and not just on the offensive end. 

Dallas' bench entered play Tuesday night averaging 33.6 points per game and allowing just 28.7 per game. It's that kind of advantage when your starters come off the floor that leads to starters being able to rest more, and coaches like Rick Carlisle not having to throw starters back out into weird rotations in order to plug leaks as a lead drops or a deficit widens. 

Tonight's contributor was Ian Mahinmi, who provided his first career double-double against the Warriors with 12 points and 10 rebounds to go with 2 steals and one very nasty block. Mahinmi being a viable backup center when Tyson Chandler and/or Brendan Haywood can't go gives a whole new dimension to the Mavericks, allowing them to play big against opponents. That's something that will be crucial to keep an eye on as the playoffs approach, even if the Mavericks aren't as hot as they are now (and odds are they won't be). 

It should be noted that Jason Terry is a big reason for the bench points as DeShawn Stevenson has been starting in his stead at shooting guard. Still, there's not an absence of production for Dallas off the pine as Mahinmi, Jose Juan Barea, and Shawn Marion are all capable of putting in solid to great nights if they're feeling on. That's a pretty big set of weapons to account for, and that's part of the reason Dallas has been so unstoppable thus far this season. 

Oh, and have we mentioned Rodrigue Beaubois isn't even back in action, yet? 

The Mavericks aren't just stocked at each position, they're capable of throwing together combinations to specifically counter what their opponent puts on the floor. With Rick Carlisle at the helm, the team is willing and able to adjust on the fly to problems presented, which is partially responsible for Dallas' remarkable ability to close this season. 

When Beaubois returns, the Mavs will feature a stellar four-guard rotation, a solid punch-counterpunch at small forward with Caron Butler and Shawn Marion providing contrasting approaches, and a three-headed center system with veterans Haywood and Chandler backed up by young buck Mahinmi. Quite simply, when the Mavericks are healthy, they are not a team you want to run into on a dark and stormy night. And unlike the Hornets, this success doesn't seem to be the product of a hot streak. 

Get past all that? 

You've still got Dirk Nowitzki in effect. 

#1 (for now ) indeed. 
Posted on: November 15, 2010 11:21 pm
Edited on: November 15, 2010 11:39 pm
 

Mavs zero in on Paul to give Hornets first loss

Dirk and Terry help Mavericks send Hornets to first season loss as they corral Chris Paul in second half. Posted by Matt Moore

Well, it had to happen sometime. The Hornets had managed to gun out to a franchise-best 8-0 start this season with new head coach Monty Williams leading revamped bench and wing units alongside a healthy Chris Paul. But Dirk Nowitzki and a very solid overall performance from the Mavericks proved too much and the Hornets suffered their first loss this season in Dallas 95-98 .

The Mavericks have now knocked off Rajon Rondo and Chris Paul in a week, and though Paul dropped a line of 22 points, 9 assists, and 4 rebounds, the widely regarded best-point-guard in the league had 20, 5, and 4 at halftime. In the second half, Dallas threw a combination of hard hedges off the pick and roll and constant run-outs on the drive and kick to contain Paul. Paul often wound up late in the shot clock, having to hoist off-balance fade-aways as the Mavericks used many of the same tricks they used against Rondo to keep Paul out of the paint.

On the offensive end, Jason Terry was en fuego. While the Horents actually played great defense, their focus was on trying to stop Dirk Nowitzki (they didn't, he finished with 25 on just 12 shots), and Terry managed to slip out in transition or get open off offensive rebounds. The Hornets controlled the glass, but Dallas was more patient on offense, pulling in a higher free throw rate.

Now that the Hornets have suffered their first loss, the question now will become if they can go back to their winning ways or if this streak of play was a combination of things going right. A lot went right for New Orleans tonight, with Willie Green and Peja Stojakovic playing well in a rare appearance. Their defense suffered at the hands of good ball movement and Dirk-caliber play from Dirk. But if they keep up the kind of effort they've given in the first nine games, it's hard to see the Hornets not maintaining their spot near the top of the West.

For Dallas? Look out. Once again, this is a great team, deep and talented, and they've just solved two of the best point guards in the league. You can't stop those guys, as proven by their stat lines. But by committing your defensive scheme to stop them, you can make life hard enough to get a win.


Posted on: November 4, 2010 9:17 am
Edited on: November 4, 2010 9:17 am
 

Shootaround 11.14.10: Post-Halloween Scary

Posted by Matt Moore

  • Richard Jefferson hit four deep corner threes last night to help the Spurs bury the Suns (again). NBA Playbook breaks down one of them . Next time your team hoists another contested mid-wing three, ask yourself why it is that the best teams work for high percentage areas for high percentage shots and bad ones don't. 
  • Doug Collins left in the second half of the Sixers first win against the Pacers with vertigo symptoms. Collins' concussion was some scary stuff.
  • It would be remarkably easy to find only negatives to talk about in the Pacers' loss to the Sixers (the Sixers first win) by a comfortable margin. But 8 Points 9 Seconds points out that a big difference in this year versus last is that last night, no Pacer showed up his teammates . Bad teams turn to good teams when things like that start happening. It's early, so things can still go south, but it's a good sign. Losing well can at least be a building block for a young team, as long as it doesn't happen too often.

Posted on: October 25, 2010 8:04 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 8:00 pm
 

Shootaround 10.25.10: Season starts tomorrow

Rejoice! The NBA season starts tomorrow. As the league's 30 teams make final cuts and set their rosters, here's a first look around the NBA at this week's happenings. Magic talks contraction, Delonte dances, Steve Nash gripes, Jeff Green stays focused, Shelden Williams and Jason Terry start, plus a whole lot more.  
Posted by Ben Golliver
  • Los Angeles Lakers legend Magic Johnson tells NaplesNews.com he would be in favor of contraction in the NBA. “How much would it hurt the league if we lost teams? It wouldn’t hurt it. It might make it better,” Johnson said. “… I think if you take away a couple teams, the talent level goes up and the league will only benefit, so I don’t see a problem with that. We just hope that we put a good product out on the court, and that’s the key.”
  • Phoenix Suns all star point guard Steve Nash tells Seth Pollack of SB Nation Arizona that he wouldn't bet on the Suns to make the playoffs in the Western Conference and that the team has chemistry question marks. "To be honest, if I was outside this picture and a betting man, I would probably pick us to be outside of the playoffs considering all the changes and the new guys."
  • Eddie Sefko of the Dallas Morning News writes  that perennial sixth man of the year candidate Jason Terry will open the season starting for the Mavericks. "Terry started at shooting guard Friday in a 97-96 win over Houston in the preseason finale. Coach Rick Carlisle has kept a tight lip on who will start the opener against Charlotte. But it appears Terry has the inside track, at least until Roddy Beaubois returns from left foot surgery."
  • It's a contract year for both forward Jeff Green and guard Russell Westbrook in Oklahoma City, but Thunder coach Scott Brooks tells Darnell Mayberry of The Oklahoman that he's not worried about Green putting his own interests above the team. "Maybe because I know him,” Brooks said. "I know who he was when he came into the league, and he hasn't changed. He still works every day in practice. He still tries to get better. He still tries to make the right play. He's not forcing shots. He's not taking bad shots … He hasn't forced anything in camp. He's a pro and he likes being on this team.”
  • ESPN.com's Michael Wallace quotes LeBron James on Celtics fans in advance of tomorrow's season opener between Boston and Miami. "They bleed green; that’s all they care about,” James said. “We have to be mentally focused and mentally prepared. Some arenas believe and love basketball more than others. Sometimes, more history adds more intimidation. Not saying it’s an intimidation factor for me. It’s never been an intimidation factor for me. But as far as the crowd and as far as the team, Boston is one of those hostile environments to play.” 
  • Minnesota Timberwolves wing Martell Webster, acquired in a draft night trade from the Portland Trail Blazers, will find out if he needs surgery on an ailing back today. Jerry Zgoda of StarTribune.com quotes Webster: "It's just one of those things that starts to nag and you don't want to make it worse."
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com