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Tag:Trevor Ariza
Posted on: August 17, 2011 8:34 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2011 10:47 pm
 

P. Diddy goes to UCLA with Davis, Love, Westbrook

Posted by Ben Golliverwestbrook-diddy

What's the only way to top having four NBA players, including two All-Stars, in your college class? By adding a hip hop mogul, of course.

On Wednesday, Cleveland Cavaliers guard Baron Davis and Minnesota Timberwolves forward Kevin Love tweeted that hip hop legend Sean Combs, better known as P. Diddy, was attending summer school with them at UCLA.

"Another great day at school," Davis tweeted. "Recruited P. Diddy to our history class!! Good looking big bro."

"We recruited a new classmate," Love confirmed, attaching the picture shown to the right as proof.

As ESPN.com noted, Davis and Love are just half of the NBA contingent in this particular summer school classroom.  
In the meantime, Love is back on campus, taking a course on American popular culture. He said former Bruins and current NBA players Russell Westbrook, Baron Davis and Trevor Ariza are all in the same class. The four-credit class will make him a sophomore after he left UCLA following his freshman season in 2008. 

"I don't want the lockout to go to December or January but just in case I've signed up to be in class in the fall," Love said. "I'm excited to have the opportunity to do so but I'm hoping my fall classes get cut short."
According to CBSSports.com's UCLA RapidReports, Diddy was on campus because his son, a high school football player, is apparently getting a recruiting look from the Bruins. 

Back when the lockout went into effect, I promised my family that I would put away the snark in any post about NBA players going back to college to fulfill promises to their families. Working towards a degree is an admirable pursuit for anyone, and it's one of the smartest things a professional athlete can do given the relatively short career time frame and all the pitfalls that go with becoming extremely rich overnight.

But then P. Diddy had to get involved and it's pretty much impossible to write about him in 2011 without snark. So we'll just stop right here. Good times, though. Good times.

Image via Kevin Love on Twitter
Posted on: February 3, 2011 4:16 pm
Edited on: February 3, 2011 5:40 pm
 

Hornets to sign Pavlovic to fill in for Ariza

The New Orleans Hornets will reportedly sign Sasha Pavlovic to a 10-day contract after Trevor Ariza went down with an ankle injury.

Posted by Ben trevor-ariza Golliver.


New Orleans Hornets forward Trevor Ariza suffered a sprained right ankle during Wednesday night's game against the Oklahoma City Thunder, and the Times-Picayune reported Wednesday the injury is fairly serious.
It appears Ariza could be sidelined indefinitely. After the game, he wore a protective boot and walked with crutches. 
“It’s very disappointing,’’ said Ariza, who will be examined by team doctors today. “I never had injury with my ankle before.’’
The injury occurred when Ariza went to the basket and came down on the back of Thunder forward Jeff Green’s foot.
On Thursday, the Hornets said an MRI showed Ariza has a right medial ankle sprain, making him questionable for Saturday vs. the Lakers.

The Times-Picayune reports  Ariza could miss "possibly two weeks" and that the Hornets will sign free agent wing Sasha Pavlovic, who played for the Dallas Mavericks earlier this season but was released in January so that the team wouldn't have to guarantee his contract for the rest of the season. ESPN.com reports that the Hornets, who have an open roster spot, will sign Pavlovic to a 10-day contract.

Pavlovic averaged 4.1 points and 1.2 rebounds in 16.3 minutes per game in his 10 appearances for the Mavericks. He's in his eighth year in the NBA. Assuming he signs his contract on Friday, as expected, Pavlovic will be available for games against the Lakers, Minnesota Timberwolves, New Jersey Nets, Orlando Magic and Chicago Bulls.

Ariza has averaged 11.1 points, 5.5 rebounds and 2.0 assists per game this season for the Hornets. New Orleans is currently 32-19 on the season, good for third place in the extremely competitive Southwest Division.

Posted on: February 3, 2011 9:59 am
 

Shootaround 2.3.11: Getting better all the time

Injuries improving, the Cavaliers are sad, Paul Pierce wants Ray in the 3-Point Contest so he can beat him. Shootaround. 
Posted by Matt Moore

Trevor Ariza severely sprained his ankle in last night's loss to the Timberwolves, and is out indefinitely. Ariza's had another inconsistent season, but he's still a significant part of the Hornets, who are now without two starters as Okafor continues to recover. They can't afford to lose too many guys more. 

Marcus Camby says he's close to returning. His coach says he's out a "few more weeks." Which is it? Maybe Nate's just used to saying (X player) will be out "a few more weeks" and responded by reflex. 

Scott Skiles says Brandon Jennings' minute restriction could be lifted soon.

A comprehensive review of possible trade partners for the Sacramento Kings

A celebration of Christian Eyenga getting into the top 200 in Cavalier points history. Things are sad in Cleveland. 

Kevin Love's odds at the All-Star game are not good

Paul Pierce wants to face down one guy in the 3-point contest: Ray Allen

Does the league need to do a better job of screening ownership? Maybe if they had done that in the beginning, contraction wouldn't be such a hot topic right now. 

Derrick Rose is the type to hold grudges, which is partially why he beat the Clippers, and partially why his free throw shooting has improved so much. 

In case you missed it, Rick Carlisle says Dirk Nowitzki is the MVP
Posted on: November 5, 2010 11:10 pm
Edited on: November 6, 2010 1:47 am
 

At the Buzzer: CP3 bests the Miami 3 in Big Easy

Hornets topple Heat as CP3 shines alongside Okafor. Posted by Matt Moore

Chris Paul overcame a furious comeback from the Miami Heat, dishing to a wide-open Trevor Ariza for the game-clinching three-pointer while David West nailed the key free throws to hold on for a 96-93 win in New Orleans to push the Hornets to 6-0.

Notes and miscellanea:

  • First off, the Heat, for reasons beyond comprehension, continue to work with their stars to create wide-open shots for teammates who are not capable of hitting them to the volume they are being asked to. Worse, they continue to force the issue even when said teammates are obviously colder than a polar bear's toenails. James Jones and Eddie House were a combined 2 of 13 from 3-point land, and yet House the shooter they went to, down 3 with seven seconds remaining. Not Wade, Not James. 0-fer Eddie House. 
  • But if the Heat want to really examine why they lost their second game in the first two weeks of the season, they have to examine the two areas everyone pointed to coming in. The Hornets abused them both at the point guard and center positions. Carlos Arroyo tried for about a half to guard Chris Paul before Erik Spoelstra was forced to turn to Wade to defend CP3, who did a much better job. Well, I mean, held him to only 19 assists and 13 points.
  • Meanwhile, Okafor was dominant, with 26 points on 12 of 13 shooting and 13 boards. Best of all, for the first time that I've seen, Okafor really looked to understand the kind of movement he needed to have with CP3. He even had some of those alley-oops Tyson Chandler used to catch back in the Hornets run of 2008. He had the mid-range going, the baby hook, the swing-up fadeaway, the whole repertoire. And by whole repertoire, I mean a lot of shots he's never shown reliably before this year. Devastating inside-out attack.
  • For Ariza to nail the corner three to finish the game was a shock because he didn't look good for much of the game, opting for pull-up threes in transition and other Ariza-shots. But he hit the one he needed to.
  • The Hornets broke out in transition ridiculously fast. With Paul getting 5 steals, they managed to burst out and all the Hornets would rush out. The Heat on the other hand seemed to be trying to glide down court, with little to no intensity. 
  • Jason Smith was huge for the Hornets, as he continuously burned the Heat who let him have the 18 foot jumper.
  • Wade had 28, 10, and 7, but also had 7 turnovers. His matchup with CP3 late was pretty epic.
  • The Heat eventuall switched to a shallow perimeter trap on Paul, which is the best way to go. A high trap he'll split and in space he's killer. Unfortunately, the Hornets switched to a double-screen which freed him to do damage down the stretch.
  • The game nearly came down to a technical foul called on Paul after throwing his fist following an offensive foul. Paul even tried to contain himself afterwards to not get busted, to no avail. The officials are still not kidding about the tech rules. 
  • Chris Bosh had a rebound tonight. A single board. And was useless in the post. He was great from mid-range and on tip-ins, but Bosh is simply not the kind of low-post big you'd want him to be.
  • The Heat defense, which had been so good, gave up a 107.9 efficiency rating, and 49% field goal percentage. That's not going to get it done.
  • Conversely, it may be time to start accepting that the Hornets are for real. The trifecta of firepower they brought in (Paul-West-Okafor) is firing on all cylinders, their shooters are hitting from the outside, and true to Monty Williams' word, they're out and running in transition. It's still early, but the Hornets very much look for real.

Finally, these images from our GameTracker pretty much put it in perspective.








Note the numbers, for Okafor. That big square down in the paint? That stands for 9 shots, 8 makes. Manly.

Posted on: November 1, 2010 4:23 pm
Edited on: November 1, 2010 4:25 pm
 

What we've learned after a week of the NBA season

Posted by Royce Young

In a sport where the regular season is six months long with 82 games packed in between, it's hard to really draw any meaningful conclusions from the opening week of the season. Some fans are panicking, some are filled with unbridled optimism and some are feeling more of the same after spending September convincing themselves, "No, I really think Thaddeus Young can be an All-Star and if so, who knows?"

So despite the fact that roughly only three percent of the season has been played, let's look at five, of what could be 500, things we've learned this far.

The Hornets might be kind of good. Chris Paul, remember that guy? He's pretty good. And his team, the Hornets? They might be too.

They're 3-0, with one of those wins coming on the road against the Spurs. They beat San Antonio, Milwaukee and Denver, three quality opponents that all were in the playoffs last season. They've yet to allow 100 points and are doing an outstanding job of sharing the ball and getting scoring from multiple spots.

With Paul back running the show and new additions Trevor Ariza and Marco Belinelli doing their parts to fill in some scoring, this team could be potentially dangerous. There's not a ton of depth there so if Paul or someone else goes out for an extended period, times get get tougher, but as of now, the 3-0 Hornets look fairly legit.

What makes the Heat scary isn't what you think it is. Teaming LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh together likely makes opposing coaches think, "How in the bleep are we going to stop those guys?"

And while that's still true, the real question might should be, 'How in the bleep are we going to score on those guys?"

Nothing has been more impressive about the Heat thus far than their defense. Toss out any cliche NBA word and it works to describe it. Stifling. Swarming. Stingy. Scoring on the Heat right now is harder than scoring on San Francisco Giants. They can guard every position and their apparent weakness hasn't been exposed at all, even against the league's best big man in Dwight Howard.

The Heat lead the league in defensive efficiency, giving up just 86.6 points per 100 hundred possessions. That's outstanding.

Miami will be tough to beat throughout because of the matchup issues it creates, but what could make them a true title contender is the fact they don't let you score.

The Clippers are probably the Clippers again . In the opener against the Blazers, for three quarters there was legitimate reason for excitement in Clipperland. Blake Griffin looked fantastic, Eric Gordon was scoring and the team has some actual energy and excitement about it.

But as often happens with Clipper seasons, it could be over after that first game. There was some buzz surrounding this team as a potential dark horse in the West, but Sunday's game against the Mavericks really pointed out some serious issues.

The Clippers had no idea what to do offensively. There was no scheme or plan. It was all pointing, talking and bumping into each other. Whoever was running point was basically trying to draw a play from the top of the key as the 24 second clock ticked away. Griffin appeared to be a little frustrated, specifically in the fact that nobody seemed to be playing as hard as him.

It's early and the Clippers have enough talent win some games, but the first impression has been more of the same.

For some reason, Kurt Rambis just doesn't like Kevin Love . After three games, Kevin Love is fifth in the NBA with 13.0 rebounds per game. He's averaging 14 points per game. But here's the problem: He's averaging just 25.3 minutes per game.

Extend Love's current stats out to a per 40 minute average and he's putting up 22.1 ppg and 20.5 rpg. And yet, he continues to get bench minutes in what's now, a starter's role.

It's not like the Wolves are winning and Love is just fitting in. Right now, Minnesota is 1-2 and has struggled scoring (something Love does well). They are however the best rebounding team in the league with a plus-12.7 differential. Imagine how good they'd be if their best rebounder saw over 30 minutes a game?

The Kevin Love situation is honestly one of the most fascinating storylines in the league this season to me. He's Minnesota's best player, best scorer and best rebounder, yet he doesn't get as many minutes as Wayne Ellington, Michael Beasley or Luke Ridnour.

Now in Rambis' defense, nobody on the team averages more than 30 minutes per game and most everyone hovers under 25 minutes per. So maybe it's an institutional thing. But then again, maybe that's a good explanation as to why they haven't been successful thus far. Common sense says play your best players the most minutes. But the Wolves are just preaching transparency and honesty, not common sense.

Nobody knows if Houston is good or just average yet. In the Rockets' opening game against the Lakers, they held a lead for the majority of the night before the defending champs turned it on and won behind late heroics from Shannon Brown. But most agreed - the Rockets will be good.

Then they lost their next two games to the Warriors and the Nuggets which left some scratching their heads. So are the Rockets good, average or possibly bad?

I think you can certainly take out bad because this Houston club has players and will win. But is it a top four team in the West? Maybe not. Really, are they a playoff team? That's potentially up in the air as the last two games really showcased some major defensive problems Houston has right now.

This upcoming set of games could put the Rockets in a big hole early if they don't get their act together though. After playing the Hornets at home, Houston goes on the road for six of their next eight.
Posted on: October 17, 2010 6:48 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 7:53 pm
 

Report: Spurs Trade Curtis Jerrells To Hornets

The San Antonio Spurs have reportedly traded guard Curtis Jerrells to the New Orleans Hornets for a draft pick.
Posted by Ben Golliver
Alex Kennedy of Hoopsworld.com reportsthat the San Antonio Spurs have traded backup point guard Curtis Jerrells to the New Orleans Hornets.
The San Antonio Spurs have traded reserve point guard Curtis Jerrells to the New Orleans Hornets in exchange for a second-round pick, sources tell HOOPSWORLD.
The obvious link between the two organizations is new Hornets GM Dell Demps, who was a front office executive for the Spurs prior to his hire by New Orleans this summer. The Hornets have been in need of backcourt depth behind Chris Paul after they shipped Darren Collison to the Indiana Pacers in a trade that netted wing Trevor Ariza. Jerrells will join a backcourt that includes Paul, Willie Green (also acquired by trade ) and promising second-year scorer Marcus Thornton. The Spurs have two quality point guards in long-time starter Tony Parker and solid backup George Hill, who started for much of last season as Parker dealt with injury issues. Jerrells played for the D-League's Austin Toros last year and was called up by the Spurs, but never saw any action .
Posted on: September 23, 2010 4:38 pm
 

Preseason Primer: Houston Rockets

Posted by Matt Moore

The Rockets finally have Yao Ming healthy. They finally have Tracy McGrady out of their hair. They finally have the pieces together to make another run. But can any of the pieces fit together? Are they really as dangerous as everyone says they are? Does speaking in rhetorical questions make you want to read this, our next selection in our Preseason Primers ? Let's find out as we talk about the Rox.


Training camp site: Houston, TX (Hidalgo, TX in early October)

Training camp starts: September 25th

Key additions: Brad Miller (free agent), Courtney Lee (trade), Patrick Patterson (draft)

Key subtractions: Trevor Ariza (trade), David Andersen (trade)

Likely starting lineup:
Aaron Brooks (PG), Kevin Martin (SG), Shane Battier (SF), Luis Scola (PF), Yao Ming (C)

Player to watch:
Patrick Patterson. Assuming the Rox don't go all nuts and acquire Carmelo Anthony during camp, their starting lineup is pretty well set. But Patterson is a rookie who comes out of that ridiculous Kentucky class and could wind up being the kind of flex player that makes a big impression on Rick Adelman. He's versatile, strong, has a good mid-range, and can work inside of a complex offense. He's got a great opportunity to make an impact for the Rockets during camp.


Chemistry quiz:
The Rockets have seemed like a team that's liked one another for years. They hung together when Yao Ming went down, and their samurai-like approach last year was noble, even if it fell short. Basically, even without the star talent you need to win in this league, the Rockets were the team you didn't want to run into in a dark alley. They were tough, gritty, and hung together. The addition of Kevin Martin, trying to reassert himself as a premier player in this league could cause issues, and there's no telling if the same goodwill will maintain with as many changes as the Rockets have made in the past two years. But the core elements are in place, and the tone of camp should be fun and focused, instead of contentious and tense. Not having solified expectations due to Yao's injury should help with manners as well.


Camp battles:
Small forward was set to be a huge battle but promising second year man Chase Budinger tweaked an ankle and won't be able to battle old man Battier for the slot left open by Trevor Ariza's departure. Jermaine Taylor, Courtney Lee, and Jared Jeffries should have a good one for the backup role behind Martin. Jordan Hill vs. Patterson should make for a nice one as well, with Hill's scrap versus Patterson's finesse providing contrast in style.

Injury issues:
Budinger's ankle is significant, but other than that the Rockets seem really healthy and don't have any pro...OH, YEAH. Yao Ming is coming back from an injury that's held him out for a year and a half and is trying to just stay on the floor while the rest of the team holds its breath everytime his feet leave the ground. camp.

Biggest strength:
Doin' work. The Rockets put in a full effort every night, a testament to both the roster assembled and Rick Adelman's job. They lacked an identity last year without Yao, but it did help them to adjust to whatever they faced. The Rockets can get out and run, or grind it out. They're really best when they're doing both. They'll battle for every loose ball and every player knows his role. It's a strong team they've put together.

Glaring weakness:
Three point shooting. Brooks isn't an efficient shooter. Martin's three point shooting dropped off a cliff last season. Budinger can shoot, but the rest of the team isn't great from the arc, including backup point guard Kyle Lowry.
Posted on: September 20, 2010 4:14 pm
Edited on: September 20, 2010 4:15 pm
 

Preseason Primers: Hornets

Posted by Royce Young

Time to give the hardwood a good waxing and to put some air in the roundball. Training camp is seriously just days away. Ken Berger has already kicked the priming off looking at Boston and San Antonio's training camp issues . And so let's start over here with a team with a disgruntled star that had people talking about where he could go before Carmelo Anthony took over - the New Orleans Hornets.

New Orleans Hornets


Training camp site: New Orleans, LA

Training camp starts: Sept. 28

Key additions: Trevor Ariza (trade), Marco Belinelli (trade), Craig Brackins (draft), Quincy Pondexter (draft), Mustafa Shakur (free agent)

Key subtractions: Darren Collison (trade), James Posey (trade)

Likely starting lineup: Chris Paul, PG; Marcus Thornton, SG; Trevor Ariza, SF; David West, PF; Emeka Okafor, C

Player to watch:   Chris Paul. Coming off an injury that caused him to miss the last 37 games of the season, some wonder if Paul will be the same player. Add in the turbulent offseason with rumors about his New Orleans future and all eyes are on CP3 as he heads to camp. Marcus Thornton is maybe the most intriguing player on the roster because of his potential to break out as a big time scorer, but the Hornets are Chris Paul's team and therefore, he's the one to be watching.

Chemistry check: Though Chris Paul tried to sooth some of the chemistry questions kicked up by him this summer by reportedly asking out of New Orleans, it's still something that's likely to linger over the team. Since it appears that Paul is kind of running the team with Dell Demps catering to Paul's wishes and desires, how does that make the rest of the squad feel?

Obviously CP3 is the leader. Obviously, he's the star. But how does all of that fit in with the rest of the group? Plus, Paul has a new running buddy in Trevor Ariza, a player that shoots first and asks questions later. How does Paul integrate his game with Ariza's trigger happy approach? Luckily for the Hornets, Monty Williams is a good man to have in charge of these issues and someone that can likely solve any kind of chemistry uptick.

Camp battles: One key area is up for discussion going into camp for the Hornets: Who's Chris Paul's new backup point guard? After trading Darren Collison as part of the Ariza deal, the Hornets signed D-Leaguer Mustafa Shakur in the offseason and have recently inked D.J. Strawberry to come to camp and compete for the job. It's the type of position battle that's not overly important because if all goes well, whoever wins the job will only get 8-10 minutes a night. But if something goes wrong like it did last season, it could become a very important spot for the Hornets.

At shooting guard, Marcus Thornton is almost assured of having the starting job, but Marco Belinelli could potentially push him a bit.

Long shots: Strawberry isn't necessarily a long shot, but the job is Shakur's to lose. The Hornets also are bringing in D-League journeyman Daryl Watkins who has spent time with the Kings, Spurs and Clippers. He's a big guy that has somewhat of a chance because of the thin Hornet front line, but it's not likely he makes the team.

Biggest strength: The starting five. Not to pull a Rodney Stuckey here, but on paper, NOLA has a pretty nice first first. Paul, Thornton, Ariza, David West and Emeka Okafor. That five should be able to match up with most, assuming Thornton continues his rise as a prolific scorer. West is a former All-Star, Okafor should have a full run with Paul and is a quality rim-protector and Ariza can score and is a capable lockdown defender.

Glaring weakness:   Depth. As is the case with a lot of teams with good front line talent, there's just not much waiting in reserve. The Hornets traded James Posey and Collison to get Ariza, which definitely hurt their depth. Add in the fact that they might have a D-Leaguer backing up CP3, Darius Songaila spelling West and Aaron Gray as their backup center, and you've got a team with issues on the bench. If rookies Quincy Pondexter and Craig Brackins can step up, those issues can be resolved but as of right now, it's a major question.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com