Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:New York Knicks
Posted on: March 7, 2012 1:22 am
Edited on: March 7, 2012 1:32 am
 

Report Card 3.6.12: Underdogs rule Tuesday

Posted by Ben Golliver  

The Bobcats enjoyed a rare win on Tuesday, over the Magic no less. (Getty Images)

Each night, Eye on Basketball brings you what you need to know about the games of the NBA. From great performances to terrible clock management the report card evaluates and eviscerates the good, the bad, and the ugly from the night that was.

Charlotte Bobcats When you only win about once every two weeks and your first win since Feb. 17 comes against the No. 3 seed Orlando Magic, in convincing fashion, it's time to celebrate. That was the case for the Bobcats, who relentlessly pounded Orlando's defense and held the Magic offense to one-and-done looks possession after possession down the stretch, to dance their way to a 100-84 victory. Rookie Bismack Biyombo had his best game as a professional, going toe-to-toe with Dwight Howard to score 10 points, grab 15 rebounds and block an astounding 7 shots. He could barely contain his glee by the end, gesturing to the crowd in animated fashion as Charlotte walked off with the win.
Rodney Stuckey The Detroit Pistons guard outshot and outscored Kobe Bryant in a dramatic overtime win at the Palace. Stuckey scored Detroit's final seven points in regulation and tacked on another six in overtime, pushing the Pistons to an 88-85 upset win. He also put Bryant on skates with a vicious stepback crossover. He didn't do much else besides score, but that was more than enough.
Miami Heat Unlike the Magic and the Lakers, the Heat easily took care of business against lesser competition, stomping the New Jersey Nets, 108-78. Miami also enjoyed a nice soft launch in re-integrating Chris Bosh after he missed some time due to a death in the family. So why a "B"? Well, simple: irreplaceable guard Dwyane Wade suffered an apparently minor foot injury that kept him on the bench late. The good news: the Sun-Sentinel reports indicate he'll be fine and expects to start on Wednesday against the Hawks.
New York Knicks Dallas is now 15-7 at home, so expectations had to be somewhat tempered for the Knicks on the road. But a troubling 2-for-12 from Carmelo Anthony plus a decidedly not-superhuman performance from Jeremy Lin -- 14 points on 13 shots, 1-for-5 from deep, 7 assists and 2 turnovers, mixed in with long stretches of passive play -- make this a tough one. It was also New York's third loss in four games, with San Antonio on Wednesday. The next few weeks are critical if New York hopes to be better than the No. 8 seed.
Kobe Bryant He was due for an off night after three big scoring games in a row following the All-Star break, but Bryant's 8-for-26 shooting was a major reason the Lakers let what should have been an easy win slip away. While he nailed a pretty buzzer-beater to push the game to overtime, his performance and decision-making in the extra period was erratic. A forced deep three that didn't even come close on the final possession was Bryant at his worst.
Orlando Magic This was a hot mess of a loss to the Bobcats. Orlando scored just 13 points in the fourth and couldn't mange a single point in the final 2:47, conceding an 8-0 run to close the game. On the other end, Charlotte, the NBA's worst offense, seemingly scored at will, with Corey Maggette getting to the foul line 11 times and Gerald Henderson tossing in 16 points, including some big late buckets. Do the Magic even care? This was a lacking performance in virtually every area.


E FOR EFFORT
Dirk Nowitzki (28 points on 18 shots, 3 rebounds, 1 assist, 1 steal, in 34 minutes)
Kevin Garnett (13 points, 13 rebounds, 3 assists, 2 steals, 2 blocks in 38 minutes)
Bismack Biyombo (10 points, 15 rebounds, 7 blocks, 6-for-10 free throw shooting to overcome Hack-a-Biyombo down the stretch)
Posted on: March 6, 2012 10:46 pm
Edited on: March 6, 2012 11:02 pm
 

NBA ref to Dirk Nowitzki: 'Do you want to go?'

Posted by Ben Golliver  

Dallas Mavericks All-Star forwrd Dirk Nowitzki wasn't pleased with a no-call but he had no idea his protests would be met with four threats of ejection.

In one of the more direct exchanges between NBA referee and superstar player that you will ever see caught on camera, official Eric Dalen asked Nowitzki directly if he would like to be ejected on four occasions.

"Do you want to go?" Dalen asked, over and over, after first hitting Nowitzki with a technical foul for arguing a no-call on a drive attempt.

The scene began with a little more than 7 minutes remaining in the fourth quarter of a Tuesday night game between the Mavericks and the New York Knicks. Nowitzki drove the paint against multiple Knicks defenders, only to have the ball swatted out of his possession with no foul given. Nowitzki reacted with frustration and was hit with the quick tech from Dalen. As he went to the sideline to argue that call, Dalen moved towards the scorer's table, issuing his ejection threat while looking directly at Nowitzki.

Nowitzki backed down, which was a smart move given that it was just an 8-point game at the time of the incident. The Mavericks held on for the 95-85 win. Nowitzki finished with a game-high 28 points.

Here's the video of NBA referee Eric Dalen asking Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki if he wants to be ejected.

Posted on: February 29, 2012 12:26 pm
Edited on: February 29, 2012 12:30 pm
 

Melo must change to be great

Will Carmelo Anthony's legacy be more than just that of a pure shooter? (Getty Images)

By Matt Moore
 

Gregg Doyel of CBSSports.com writes Wednesday of how Carmelo Anthony has a chance to be special and thus far... simply hasn't. Doyel specifically outlines a fact debated and wrought over constantly when it comes to Anthony, the fact that he is primarily a scorer. In these here blog circles, it's a bit more narrow than that: Melo can best be described as a volume shooter. Scorer's can be efficient, sharp-shooting, bucket-filling maniacs who don't excel at much of anything else, but what they do, they do exceptionally well. Anthony, on the other hand, is going to shoot roughly the same amount from game to game. There are nights when he's going to be brutally efficient. There are nights when he's going to be brutally inefficient. The approach never changes. And that may be the biggest problem of all with Anthony's game.

Doyel talks about the threat of winding up like a pre-Boston Kevin Garnett, what with the high praise and no substantive playoff success outside of a single season. Two thoughts there:

  • The immediate response is to bring up Anthony's Nuggets' 2009 run to the Western Conference Finals. There are a number of things to note in that regard, however. First, the Nuggets' second-round win over the Mavericks was about as tough as a series that short can be, with a crucial non-call on an intentional foul late providing quite a bit of drama in the proceedings. Second, the West that year was paper thin. It was essentially the Lakers and that's it. This isn't to take away from that Denver team, but it needs to be noted. And third, that Denver team was the same as it was for years with Melo; their success was as much due to Anthony's brilliance as it was to George Karl's ability to coach around Anthony's talents. The two things worked side-by-side, they just didn't necessarily work together. It was like "The Nuggets do this, this, and this well, and also Carmelo Anthony is very good." 
  • Doyel mentions that Garnett did everything else in his time in Minnesota, "scored, rebounded, assisted, defended, hustled, led."
And it's that last part that seems particularly relevant as the Knicks continue to try and adjust to life with his nearly entirely new lineup from the start of the season (and without a major trade!). Jeremy Lin, J.R. Smith, Melo, Amar'e Stoudemire, and Tyson Chandler. How does Anthony fit? We've talked about some x's and o's, but there are some other questions invovled.

For starters, most volume shooters are that because they are not good at any other particular area. Is Anthony that kind of player? Well, no. He's averaged 6.3 rebounds for his career, with a high of 7.3, very good for a small forward. Anthony can have games where he controls the defensive glass. What about passing? The 2009 Western Conference Finals run from Anthony's Nuggets featured him dishing 4.1 assists per game. He had a 19.8 percent assist rate that season (percentage of team assists), higher than any regular season for Anthony before... this one? We'll come back to that in a minute. And what about defense? There are metrics I could run at you, but let's just say this. 

The Nuggets' most successful season with Anthony, that 2009 run, came when Anthony became a lock down defender for about 30 games. He was simply phenomenal. That may be the most frustrating thing about Anthony, who is widely regarded as a turnstyle defensively. He can be an excellent defender. He can lock up guys, destroy their spacing, ruin their day. He just... doesn't. 

The key for Anthony may be honestly to get as far away from one of his biggest mentors' approaches as possible. Anthony and Kobe Bryant share a kinship in their approach to the game. But Bryant's success in essentially doing things his way 100 percent of the time is nearly impossible to duplicate. Maybe if Anthony had Phil Jackson, it would be easier. But he doesn't. And if he wants to be successful right now, moving away from an intractable approach and towards a dominance in versatility is the best thing for him. He needs to do everything.

There are signs Melo is trying. He worked off ball for much of the first-half against the Heat, making cuts to get to the rim. It was only after the Heat had buried the Knicks (and Lin) with their suffocating defense that Anthony returned to blistering the offensive flow with Isolation sets shallow in the shot clock. His assist rate, as previously mentioned, is the highest of his career at 22.7 percent, over four per game. He's clearly trying to get his teammates involved. He's eighth among small forwards playing 30 minutes or more this season in assist rate. With the kind of talent around him, is that enough? How much can we reasonably expect?

The answer's not in the empirical, it's in the perceptible. The shift needs to continue to be Anthony working to get out of his comfort zone. Bryant has remarked several times about hoping Anthony doesn't shift his approach due to the criticism. Thing is, that criticism isn't (always) unwarranted or about devaluing his elite gifts as a scorer. It's about fit, and flow, and making the Knicks the best they can be. Michael Jordan got to play the way he wanted because he was the greatest of all time. Kobe Bryant has been able to because he's the second greatest shooting guard of all time and he was granted a team specifically built to provide him with the best support possible. Anthony is trying to fit in with a team of good players, and he is not one of the greatest of all time.

Anthony can do something "special" as Doyel describes, but he's got to become versatile, he's got to take the same approach to the other parts of the game that he does to scoring. He's always going to get the ball late with a chance to win. He's always going to get a chance to rise and fire. But for it to matter he has to take on the rest of the things that make up a complete game. 

Anthony can be great, if he chooses to be. Making this Knicks team work isn't easy. When life is hard, you have to change.
Posted on: February 28, 2012 4:56 pm
 

'All He Does Is Lin' remix by DJ Steve Porter

Posted by Royce Young

If you've been looking for probably the definitive Jeremy Lin tribute video, it's here. DJ Steve Porter, most famous for his work with Allen Iverson, has put out a remix for KnicksNow.com called "All He Does Is Lin." And as you might expect, it's terrific.

Posted on: February 28, 2012 12:37 pm
 

Jeremy Lin and the difference for a breakthrough

Jeremy Lin put in more than physical work to succeed. (Getty Images)
By Matt Moore 

There have been two big questions asked in regards to the Jeremy Lin Phenomenon which has lead the two-year-fringe-player to the heights of NBA stardom and reinvigorated the Knicks' season. They are two separate questions that appear dependent on how you view players in the NBA. 

1. How did so many people miss out on what this kid can do?

2. Where did this kid come from?

In the former, there's a sentiment that Lin was always capable of doing this and just didn't get a chance to play. That somehow, basketball ability is not a developed skill, it simply is or is not. And that makes sense in a lot of ways in terms of today's NBA environment. Stars are largely self-evident, and you can tell they will be stars long before they're even drafted. LeBron James was going to be the No.1 pick in the draft form the time he was 16 (maybe earlier). The idea is that players can play, and all that's left is the basketball intelligence of the assessing personnel. In short, the idea is that the Warriors and Rockets are "idiots for whiffing on Jeremy Lin."

To take this approach is a lot like working backwards with circular logic. Jeremy Lin is good, so Jeremy Lin has always been good.

This isn't the case.

In a painstaking article from over the weekend, Howard Beck of the New York Times wrote a comprehensive account of Lin's path from high school to Harvard to the Warriors to D-League to the Knicks. It breaks down the entire process and talks to several coaches involved in his basketball development. The NBA, especially its elder statesmen, tend to shy away from the idea of development. Even Red Auerbach often (but not always) held the opinion of basically "the kid can play or he can't play." It's an easy approach. But with AAU, the shortened college tenure, the higher number of players and teams, the higher level of skill and the more developed playsets and schemes at the NBA level, lost is the fact that there are good players who need the right course of developmento get where they are. Lin has credited his coaches at every level, including his time spent in the D-League, with getting where he is now, on top of the world (unless that Heat game proves to be the end of the ride).

But lots of teams center on development. A lot of players get the same kind of help Lin did, often more. So what is it that made Lin make it through the process and come out on the other side a starting point guard on the World's Biggest Stage? 

There's a mental aspect. From the Beck piece in the New York Times
Lin’s perfectionist tendencies came out in a 3-point-shooting drill called “beat the ghost,” in which Lin earned 1 point for every shot he made at the arc and the “ghost” earned 3 points for every shot Lin missed.

On one occasion, Lin made 17 3-pointers but lost 21-17, then kicked the ball in anger, Scheppler recalled with a chuckle. He refused to stop until he beat the ghost. It took 14 games. When Scheppler tallied up all of the scores for the day, Lin had converted 71 percent of his shots from the arc. “That’s the beauty of Jeremy Lin,” Scheppler said. “It’s not about moral victories. It’s ‘I have to win.’ ”
via Jeremy Lin’s Evolution - NYTimes.com.

It's not enough to have the physical tools to improve upon. Players have to be checked in and want to improve, they have to want to dedicate themselves. Players need to look at the D-League, at extra coaching, at offseason workouts as imperative. It's not enough to just be superior athletes or talented shooters. There has to be a drive to make the most of potential and opportunities. Otherwise, you're only going to go as far as your natural talent takes you.

Should the Warriors or Rockets, both of whom let Lin go, have recognized that drive? Yes and no. Being a hard worker shows itself, but there are lots of hard workers who don't have the ability. You have to recognize not only their drive and ability, but be able to recognize that they are a good fit with a development plan. Ego gets in the way of that a lot of times.

You can't blame the Rockets, and you can't entirely credit the Knicks. It takes the right combination of events to occur for the situation to be right for something like Lin's rise to happen. But the one person you can credit is Lin. He's the one that put in the work.
Posted on: February 26, 2012 1:42 pm
Edited on: February 26, 2012 1:46 pm
 

Nike selling $130 Jeremy Lin shoes

Jeremy Lin has his own Nike shoes. (SlamXHype.com)

Posted by Ben Golliver 

It's gotta be the shoes. How else to explain the rapid rise of New York Knicks guard Jeremy Lin, the roster cut turned global icon?

Nike will begin capitalizing on Lin's incredible rise to fame by selling a $130 version of its Hyperfuse sneakers in New York Knicks colors, according to Reuters. To be clear, these aren't "Air Jeremy's" or "Air Lin" signature models, but they are the shoes worn by Lin this season.

Nike said it will launch the Nike Zoom Hyperfuse Low basketball shoes, built especially for Lin, this weekend in Orlando, Florida, where the NBA is holding its All-Star festivities.

"It's not a signature line but a version of the shoe that he's been wearing this season," the company told Reuters.

The Hyperfuse sneaker is one of the most popular models worn by NBA players. Lin's version features his last name on the tongue of each shoe.

The Oregonian provides additional details
.
The Oregon-based company sent out a notice this evening announcing the Nike Zoom Hyperfuse Low iD basketball shoe created for Lin, the New York Knicks point guard who emerged from near oblivion this weekend to fame. 

The $130 shoe won't be available at off-the-shelf retail, but can be created and purchased at the NikeID.com website. Consumers can replicate the exact customization options of Lin's shoe. 
Newsday reported that a Nike spokesman issued a "no comment" when asked whether Nike has plans to produce a signature line for Lin in the future.

Sneaker companies generally reserves signature lines for established stars. All-Stars Kobe Bryant, Kevin Durant and LeBron James each have signature lines. All-Stars Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul and Dwyane Wade have signature sneakers under the Jordan Brand umbrella.

Image via SlamXHype.com.
Posted on: February 26, 2012 10:02 am
 

Ben & Jerry's apologizes for Lin fortune cookies

Eye on Basketball staff

Ben & Jerry's, the ice cream maker known for its catch flavor names, has issued an apology for selling Jeremy Lin-inspired frozen yogurt containing fortune cookies at a Harvard Square location in Boston, the New York Daily News reported.

The limited-edition flavor, "Taste The Lin-sanity," contained crumbled fortune cookies before backlash resulted because of the racial overtones from using fortune cookies as part of the promotion.

"We offer a heartfelt apology if anyone was offended by our handmade Lin-sanity flavor," Ben & Jerry's said in a statement. 

The New England manufacturer replaced fortune cookies in its honey-swirl based Lin-inspired flavor with waffle cones.

"We are proud and honored to have Jeremy Lin hail from one of our fine, local universities and we are huge sports fans," Ben & Jerry's said in the news release. "Our intention was to create a flavor to honor Jeremy Lin's accomplishments and his meteoric rise in the NBA, and recognize that he was a local Harvard graduate. "We try [to] demonstrate our commitment as a Boston-based, valued-led business and if we failed in this instance we offer our sincere apologies."

The former Harvard star has caused a league- and nationwide sensation as a result of his meteoric rise to stardom as the Knicks' point guard.
Posted on: February 24, 2012 10:39 pm
Edited on: February 24, 2012 11:08 pm
 

Linsanity is now an ice cream. Make it stop.

This actually happened. (Getty Images)


I would say "this has gone too far" but we're about six days beyond that. From the Boston Herald
Vermont-based ice cream company Ben & Jerry’s has begun selling a limited-release new flavor at its Harvard Square shop in honor of basketball’s sudden sensation, Jeremy Lin, a Harvard University graduate who was an Ivy League star during his time with the Crimson, but left the Cambridge campus undrafted and largely unknown.

In recognition of the 23-year-old's overnight fame, the new ice cream pints are made at the Harvard Square shop with vanilla frozen yogurt, lychee honey swirls and come with a fresh waffle cookie on the side, which can be dipped into the ice cream or crushed on top, company officials said.
via Ben & Jerry's launches 'Lin-Sanity' flavor, takes out fortune cookie ingredient - Cambridge - Your Town - Boston.com.

Wait, wait, wait. It gets worse. 

Not only is it ice cream, originally it might have been racially insensitive ice cream!
The fresh waffle cookie ingredient replaces initial batches of the ice cream flavor that included "fortune cookie pieces" mixed in with the ice cream, Ryan Midden, Ben & Jerry's general manager for Boston and Cambridge said by phone today.

"There seemed to be a bit of an initial backlash about it, but we obviously weren't looking to offend anybody and the majority of the feedback about it has been positive," he said.

Midden said the primary reason for changing the cookie ingredient was because "a couple of [pints] got returned because the cookies got so soggy."
via Ben & Jerry's launches 'Lin-Sanity' flavor, takes out fortune cookie ingredient - Cambridge - Your Town - Boston.com.

Whoops. That's regrettable. 

But hey, getting an ice cream flavor is pretty awesome. Personally I think they should have mixed absinthe into the recipe, because watching Lin makes you feel like you have to be halucinating. The only way this gets more marketable is if the Knicks win a title and Lin winds up on a Wheaties box. Does anyone eat Wheaties anymore? Maybe he should just have his own cereal. Anyway, that happened, and we're all one step closer to the end of the world. 

In related news: 




(HT: SBNation.com)
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com