Tag:Joe Dumars
Posted on: February 3, 2012 5:26 pm
 

Friday 5 with KB: Power plays

By Matt Moore



In this week's edition of 
the Friday 5, KB talks the best power forward in the West, how good the Bulls are, and whether Griffin-over-Perkins was a dunk . You can follow Ken Berger on Twitter @KBergCBS


1. Who's the best power forward in the West?

If you consider Pau Gasol to be a power forward (and I do, despite the fact that he doesn't play with much power), it's hard to do better. But in terms of all-around game, LaMarcus Aldridge is about to pass him, if he hasn't already.

2. Are the Bulls better, worse, or the same as they were last year?

Better. Rip Hamilton gives them an experienced scorer for the playoffs and makes their bench more potent -- whether he starts or Ronnie Brewer does, either way. Omer Asik will be ready to contribute in a meaningful way in the playoffs and is becoming a bear to deal with on screens. Also, I love the way Derrick Rose has responded to falling short against Miami in the conference finals, with a quiet but edgy determination to go farther this time.

3. Brian Cardinal noted to me this week that teams that can go 9, 10 deep are having success. Do you think the need for depth in this crazy compacted schedule will carry over in the playoffs or are we just going to see the usual 8-man rotation we usually see?

I think it depends on the team, but for the most part, the extra days of rest, practice and game-planning will allow teams to go with a more orthodox rotation. For teams with quality bench players (Spurs, Mavs, Thunder, Bulls, Sixers), getting them additional floor time and experience during the regular season will make them more effective in the postseason.

4. What should the Pistons do to fix this mess?

Where to begin? As I alluded to in Postups, Joe Dumars could be in for some tough times. For starters, I'd see if a financially flexible contender would be willing to take Ben Gordon off my hands between now and the deadline. Then, I'd amnesty Charlie Villanueva next summer and go from there. Where I'd be going, I'm not sure, but I'd get moving in that direction -- whatever that direction is.

5. How does the Blake Griffin/Perkins dunk measure up on your all-time scale?

I don't really keep conscious track of such things. But I enjoyed the EOB roundtable on the best dunks ever, and I'll say this: 1) Like Dwight Howard's "Superman" stunt in the dunk contest, if you don't flush the ball and make the rim snap, it ain't a dunk. Impressive that Griffin is the only player in the league who can get so high above the rim that he's literally throwing the ball through the rim from on high, but still, it ain't a dunk; and 2) Whatever it was, it still wasn't better than Vince Carter over Frederic Weis.
Posted on: August 5, 2011 2:53 pm
 

Friday 5 with KB: Lockout blues

By Matt Moore



In this week's edition of the Friday 5, we take a look at what the odds are of losing the season, check in on how the Joe Dumars reclamation project is going, and ponder if there's anything to move the negotiations on the new CBA forward. 

 1. Well, it's been a downright depressing week on the labor front. Billy Hunter says he'd "bet" on losing the whole season. You've been more optimistic like me that the season will be salvaged, but I'm losing hope. What's a percentage you'd put on missing the whole year at this point?

KB: The whole season? I'd say -- and I'm just pulling this number out of thin air based on a gut reaction -- 25 percent. When I laid out my timeline for the lockout, I predicted this would be settled by Oct. 15 -- just in time to avoid the cancellation of any regular season games. Now, I'm almost certain that prediction will be wrong and that some games will be lost.

2. Whatever happened to "we both want to keep this out of the courts?" If both sides have known the other's position for months, why the increasingly antagonistic tactics from both sides? Is there any way to defuse this situation?

KB: Well, even with the lockout well into its second month and with lawsuits and labor charges flying back and forth, the two sides can continue to negotiate. And both sides know, despite the litigation, that the only way this is going to be solved is at the bargaining table. They can do that now, next month, in October, in January, or next July -- but that's where it's going to be solved. The legal tactics are efforts by each side to gain leverage and pressure the other side to move off its bargaining position. So the only way to get closer to a deal was to escalate the legal battle and see if one side or the other can win a small battle that will bring everyone closer to a deal.

3. Let's say before the lockout is one round, the first 30 days after are another, and the last week is a third. Score the rounds for the union and the NBA.

KB: OK, pre-lockout goes to the owners, 10-8. They got their lockout, which is what they wanted all along. The month of July was a draw; nothing happened, nobody won or lost anything, and Deron Williams' foray into Turkey did not open the floodgates for other stars to leave. This past week was a decisive victory for the owners, who beat the players to the legal punch, got a Republican-appointed judge in district court, and chose a venue with an appeals circuit where the law is heavily favorable to them. Also, they exposed a rift within the players' association -- the influential agents who are clamoring for decertification vs. union officials are want to wait for this to play out with the NLRB.

4. Joe Dumars called Lawrence Frank his "mulligan" this week. Do you think the hire will wind up getting the second crack Joe's looking for at success, or is the roster too far gone?

KB: There's actually a lot to like about the Pistons' roster. I like Monroe and Jerebko, love Stuckey and Gordon, and really love the Brandon Knight pick. But as has been the case for some time, it's a matter of fit. Whenever the free-agent floodgates open, Dumars will have to move Tayshaun, Rip or preferably both. L-Frank is a solid coach, and his defensive principles will get the Pistons back to their roots. But he's wired, high-strung and emotional -- all traits that will play better with the younger core than with the old guard. So nothing's changed in that respect; the old guard has to go for the Pistons to truly turn the page and move on.

5. Tell me why the endorsement money, not the salary, but endorsement money in China and overseas isn't enough to tempt players with the lure of being a "global brand."

KB: Well, several top stars already have significant endorsement deals in China. Signing there and playing there for a while certainly could enhance that. But this isn't really the question to be asking. Every move by the players should be viewed through the prism of the lockout, and what helps their bargaining position. I disagree with the NBPA over how much an overseas exodus of stars would help the union's bargaining position. I don't think a handful of stars "getting theirs" in China or anywhere else helps the union at the bargaining table. Even if 20 stars sign there -- and that would be a lot -- where does that leave the other 400 players? True, you can't have an NBA without the stars, but you can't have a powerful bargaining unit without them, either. And since they'll all have out clauses to come back when the lockout ends, what are they really accomplishing there, anyway? One last point: If the best the NBA's top players can do is $1 million a month to play overseas, what does that really tell the owners who were paying them many multiples of that under the previous CBA? As one front office executive told me recently, "I think Dr. Buss would kill to pay Kobe $1.5 million a month." Look at it another way: If a $17 million player like Deron Williams goes to Turkey and the best he can do is get $5 million, the owners respond, "Why don't you just stay here for $10 million?" That's the clearest explanation I've heard for why this overseas stuff doesn't make sense for the players.
Posted on: August 4, 2011 9:10 pm
 

Joe Dumars takes 'mulligan' with Frank hire

Posted by Ben Golliver

joe-dumars

NBA GMs and presidents don't often publicly admit they have made mistakes, at least not while they are still employed. 

Pistons president Joe Dumars has seen the highest of highs and the lowest of lows in his tenure in Detroit, though, and he sounded humbled this week after announcing the hiring of new coach Lawrence Frank.

In an interview with CBSDetroit.com, Dumars used a golf analogy to explain the hire.  

"What do they call a do-over in golf? A mulligan? This is my mulligan here, man," Dumars said. "This is my one do-over that I want to get right in the worst way right now."

Frank becomes the seventh man to coach the Pistons since the Dumars era began in 2000-2011. He also becomes the third coach since the 2008-2009 season as Michael Curry lasted just one year, winning 39 games, and John Kuester barely made it through two seasons, winning 27 games in 2009-2010 and 30 games in 2010-2011, while dealing with roster mutinies and public disagreements with players.

Dumars said the experiences with Curry and Kuester led him to take a more deliberate process in selecting Frank. 

"If I had to do [the previous hires] over again, I would probably take as much time as this one," Dumars admitted. "What a long process does, it not only allows you but it almost forces you to deal with all different types of issues. Not going through that process, you hire a guy, then after you hire him then you end up going through those things and you start seeing some red flags that you didn't see earlier on."

The Naismith Hall of Fame guard won two titles as a player with the Pistons and grabbed a third ring in 2003-2004, when his well-constructed Pistons toppled the heavily-favored Los Angeles Lakers. But that success has been marred by more than a few mulligans along the way.

In addition to the hiring failures of Curry and Kuester, Dumars drafted Darko Milicic ahead of Carmelo Anthony, Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade in the 2003 NBA Draft, trade Chauncey Billups for Allen Iverson, signed Charlie Villanueva and Ben Gordon to hefty long-term contracts and allowed the disgruntled Richard Hamilton and Tayshaun Prince to tear apart his locker room last season. That's a range bucket's worth of dropped ball mulligans in one paragraph.
Posted on: June 24, 2011 12:37 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 11:20 am
 

2011 NBA Draft Winners and Losers



Posted by Matt Moore

It's all over. After an underwhelming crop of draft choices led to a flurry of trades, the dust has settled and the picks are wearing the right hats, finally. Here are your winners and losers of the 2011 NBA Draft:

Winners

Cleveland Cavaliers: Irving is mostly a case of winning by default, but they wouldn't have been the first team to be unable to get out of their own way with an obvious pick. Irving gives them a franchise point guard to build around and was the best player overall in this draft. Going for Derrick Williams would have been sheer hubris in order to burn LeBron by choosing a replacement forward. Then, with the fourth, they could have opted for Valanciunas, which would have been a good pick. But there's a reason so many teams were chasing Tristan Thompson. His workouts showed how he would translate on the next level, and with that kind of athleticism, he provides a good running partner for Irving. They managed to not overcomplicate the combination of two top-five picks. They got good talent both small and big. That's a win right there.

Washington Wizards: The Wizards very quietly had a terrific draft. First Jan Vesely was available, who fits a need for them at slashing forward. With his athleticism and aggression, he makes a perfect partner to run the break with John Wall. Then, miraculously, Chris Singleton tumbled all the way down to No.18 where the Wizards jumped all over him. Singleton is a lottery talent that fell out of the top 14. He gives the Wizards the ability to move Andray Blatche if they can find a taker for his contract. He can rebound and defend exceptionally well. Singleton's length and athleticism, combined with a chip on his shoulder from dropping, makes him a great pick for the Wizards. Shelvin Mack in the second round was a great value pick for backup point guard.

Charlotte Bobcats: In a day, the Bobcats transformed Stephen Jackson, Shaun Livingston, the No.9 and No.19 into Corey Maggette, Bismack Biyombo, and Kemba Walker. That's a great haul. I've never been big on either of the Bobcats' draft picks, but when you consider the balance between an athletic super-freak who is unrefined and an established winner with limited upside, the Bobcats managed to grab two of the most hyped players in the draft. Biyombo provides length and athleticism to pair with Tyrus Thomas. Walker creates a complication at point guard with D.J. Augustin already being an undersized point guard. But Augustin has never won over the Bobcats organization and Walker will be given every chance to compete for the starting role. If his size issues aren't as much a concern as they've been made out to be, and if his shot creation translates to the next level, the Bobcats have just instantly created their foundation for the future while ditching one of their biggest contracts. A great start for the Cho era in Charlotte. 

Denver Nuggets: Raymond Felton got flipped for Andre Miller's non-guaranteed expiring contract and Jordan Hamilton, one of the steals of the draft who inexplicably fell. This for a guard the Nuggets didn't want in the first place. Oh, yeah, and they nabbed Kenneth Faried, who perfectly fits their needs and is a great value pick where they took him. Masai Ujiri is better than you.


Losers


Minnesota Timberwolves: Yes, again. Williams is a great pick, if they were moving Michael Beasley. Or if they were trading Williams. But David Kahn reportedly says they're not moving Williams. They wasted an opportunity to create more assets by moving either one, and instead, will now bullheadedly try to cram two similar players (three if you count Anthony Randolph) into a spot. It's a messy situation and Kahn should have taken one of the other offers made to him for the pick. Then there's the other trade, which was just a mess all over. They pulled in another Euro center to add to their collection, Brad Miller and his too-long, too-expensive contract, and ditched Jonny Flynn. The only redeeming quality is the future first which may or may not be protected into oblivion. Another sterling night for the Wolves. If Williams turns out to be worthy of the No.2 pick, and count me among the people that think he is, and the Wolves recognize that versus burying him as they did Kevin Love, this can be salvaged. From this vantage point, it doesn't look great. 

Update: Wolves wound up swapping Mirotic for the 28th and 43rd picks from the Bulls, then moved the 28th pick to Miami for the 31st pick, which they then sold as well as the 38th pick which was theirs. They used the 43rd on Malcolm Lee, and then traded for the 57th. While not getting Mirotic is a lot better than drafting him, they did all that and wound up with a first later, Malcolm Lee, and Targuy Ngombo. Not a great haul, there. Saved the boss some cash, though.

Golden State Warriors: How many guards can they need? New head coach Mark Jackson and GM Larry Riley constantly talked about defense. Then the Warriors took a shooter. They haven't moved Monta Ellis, so now on the roster they have Stephen Curry, Monta Ellis, Charlie Bell, Jeremy Lin, Acie Law and Reggie Williams. And they just added Klay Thompson. It was an unnecessary move with bigger players with more defensive presence available. The Warriors have enough talent to not need the best player available. But, again, they opt for the usual. Disappointing.

Portland Trail Blazers: Where did that come from? The Blazers first take a huge reach on Nolan Smith at No.21. Smith had his proponents as the draft got closer, and certainly isn't a terrible pick. But in taking him, they elected to create redundancy after trading too much (Andre Miller and Rudy Fernandez) for Raymond Felton. The result is a reformed back court as the Blazers had promised, but not nearly as good as one you would have thought they could carry with the pieces available. Smith may work out well, but he'll never be starter caliber. And, with as many talented guards as there were late in the draft, taking him was a bit of a shock. Jon Diebler is 6-6 and can shoot. That's about it.  


Individual Winners:


Jan Vesely: Underrated as everyone talked about Kanter and Valanciunas, Vesely not only winds up with a good team fit for himself, but stole the highlight of the night with a kiss on the mouth of his lady friend. Then he said "I like the John Wall game" in his TV interview. Vesely came off incredibly cool for a 21-year-old Euro who can't shoot.

Tristan Thompson: Congratulations, Tristan, you cleared about ten spots in three days! It's a marathon, not a race.

Joe Dumars: Lucks into Brandon Knight. Rodney Stuckey problem: solved.


Individual Losers:


Brandon Knight: Plummeted due to his attitude and wound up in dysfunctional Detroit.

Josh Selby: If there was no age limit to the draft, Selby would have been a top ten pick last year. Now he falls all the way to the second round.

Jordan Hamilton: Something really bad must have been found on Hamilton, medically or otherwise. There was a nineteen-pick differential between Hamilton and a player who has rumors of being older than listed with a back issue and a contract problem. That's not a good look for the Texas ex.
Posted on: June 5, 2011 3:28 pm
Edited on: June 6, 2011 6:34 am
 

Pistons fire John Kuester as head coach

Posted by Royce Young

It was expected, but John Kuester was relieved of his head coaching position in Detroit, the team announced today.

“Decisions like this are difficult to make,” said general manager Joe Dumars in a statement. “I want to thank John for his hard work and dedication to the organization over the last two years, however, at this time we have decided to make a change.”

Kuester became Detroit's head coach in July of 2009, replacing Michael Curry. In two seasons on the bench, Kuester led Detroit to just a record of 57-107.  As an assistant on Larry Brown's staff, he helped lead the Pistons to their 2004 championship.

It was a pretty rocky season in Detroit for Kuester and not just because the team stunk. At one point late in the year, the team arranged a bit of a protest against him as players were upset with him. It appeared Kuester had lost control of his team as veterans such as Tayshaun Prince, Richard Hamilton and Charlie Villanueva publicly voiced dissenting opinions.

Kuester butted heads with both Prince and Hamilton over playing time, sitting both for extended periods including a deactivation of Hamilton for nearly a month. Late in March, the team had even privately nicknamed Kuester "Sean Penn" because of the Penn movie "Dead Man Walking."

This firing was entirely expected, but the Pistons wanted to wait until the ownership transfer with Tom Gores' group was finished up. After David Stern announced before Game 1 of the NBA Finals that the sale was complete, it was only a matter of time. As is protocol, the new ownership group first met with Kuester and Dumars to decide any future plans. Once that meeting happened, Kuester was out.

Kuester was an assistant to new Laker head coach Mike Brown in Cleveland and is expected to join Brown's staff in Los Angeles. As for who the Pistons are looking at, reportedly former Atlanta coach Mike Woodson is an early leading candidate along with the usual list we've come to know -- Lawrence Frank, Dwane Casey, Mark Jackson, Mike Budenholzer.

Woodson though was an assistant under Larry Brown in Detroit and with a pretty solid tenure in Atlanta, would likely be a good fit for the Pistons.

Posted on: April 15, 2011 2:10 pm
 

Stern gives timetable for Pistons sale

Posted by Royce Young

The Pistons sale has seemed to drag on for forever. Last week, local businessman Tom Gores bought the team -- or at least his private equity firm did -- and at today's Board of Governors meeting, there was word on when it might finally go final.

Per SI's Chris Mannix, David Stern interviewed Gores yesterday and closed the schedule on the sale for no later than June 30 but assured that the deal will be done by the end of May.

Ken Berger noted yesterday that the longer the sale is held up, the longer the Pistons will wait to decide the future of coach John Kuester and after that, general manager Joe Dumars. Dumars is likely safe, but Kuester has a black sack over his head and is being walked to the gallows. But the Pistons aren't going anything under the sale goes through.

Also noted by Ken was this interesting nugget about the new CBA: "Also, prospective owners, such as Gores and Burkle, want economic rules fixed as a stipulation for their buys, sources say." Just a fun little something to add in there.
Posted on: April 9, 2011 6:39 pm
 

New Pistons management behind Joe Dumars

Posted by Royce Young

He was once considered one of the top NBA executives around. My, how times changed for Pistons general manager Joe Dumars.

Dumars has felt some Heat lately after the downturn of the proud Pistons the past few years. The team's salary is completely out of whack, the city has lost a lot of interest in the team and between the signings of Charlie Villanueva and Ben Gordon, Richard Hamilton's extension and the Chauncey Billups-Allen Iverson deal, Dumars has fallen out of favor.

And with new ownership taking over under Tom Gores (pending NBA approval of course), the question has come up: Will the new people clean house? No, says The Detroit Free Press:
Joe Dumars isn’t going anywhere. It’s believed Gores has told him that he can remain president for as long as he desires. It’s difficult imagining Dumars walking away after getting an owner who is as committed as he is in restoring pride to an organization reduced to rubble under Davidson’s two years as keeper to Bill Davidson’s basketball legacy.
You never can tell who is really standing in the way of such things and while I'm sure Karen Davidson's intent was not to bring down the Pistons, it very may well have fallen at her feet a bit. Dumars have proven he can build a winner, so potentially with new ownership, some of that can be restored.

It's not like the Pistons don't have some talent. There is a real money mess there, but Austin Daye, Greg Monroe, Rodney Stuckey and Jonas Jerebko, there's a decent young core in place.

Now of course the coaching situation likely won't get the same vote of confidence as John Kuester fought with his team all season long. It was a constant power struggle between him and some of the veterans, so if a big move happens over the summer, it'll likely be his dismissal.
Category: NBA
Posted on: April 8, 2011 2:20 pm
Edited on: April 8, 2011 2:25 pm
 

Pistons sold to Tom Gores, pending NBA approval

The Detroit Pistons have reportedly been sold to investor Tom Gores pending league approval. Posted by Ben Golliver.

The months of waiting are apparently over. 

Back in early February, we noted that investor Tom Gores had a deal in place to purchase the Detroit Pistons from Karen Davidson. Throughout All-Star Weekend, the sale seemed imminent, however it failed to materialize. Last week, Ken Berger of CBSSports.com reported that the negotiations were "far enough along to expect the matter to come to a vote by the Board of Governors April 14-15 in New York."

On Friday, the Detroit Free Press reports that Gores has signed an agreement to purchase the Detroit Pistons and the team's building for $420 million, pending league approval, of course.
Gores, a Los Angeles-based financier who grew up in the Flint area, has signed a purchase agreement to acquire the team and other Palace Sports & Entertainment properties. It still must be approved by the NBA.
“I am very proud to have this opportunity to be part of such a tremendous organization,” Gores said in a released statement. “I know it’s been a long process, and I appreciate the patience and support of the Detroit community. I have been impressed with the Davidson family and the way it has protected and built such a storied franchise. I grew up here, I am glad to be back, and I am very excited about all the possibilities looking forward.”
In a statement obtained by the Free Press, Pistons owner Karen Davidson said today: "We are pleased to welcome Tom Gores as the new owner of the Detroit Pistons and Palace Sports and Entertainment.
The Pistons have been a disaster on and off the court all season, with a player mutiny against coach John Kuester highlighting all sorts of minor squabbles. President Joe Dumars was unable to make any roster moves, apparently because of the ownership uncertainty, and the team just accepted its fate, heading back to the NBA Draft Lottery for the second straight season.

Will Kuester be retained? Will the roster be overhauled? Those are questions for another day. Right now, it's time to party for Pistons fans, who wasted a year of their life watching their team spins its wheels in ugly fashion.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com