Blog Entry

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

Posted on: June 29, 2011 5:55 pm
Edited on: June 29, 2011 6:04 pm
 
Posted by Matt Moore

The owners made what they felt was a concilliatory, compromising offer last week in the NBA labor negotiations. That offer was met with derision from the players' union that felt it was essentially offering to them what they already own while still asking for far too much in the way of compromises.  So now we have one more shot before the lockout we all knew was coming anyway starts Friday. 

But a report from the San Antonio Express News makes the lockout sound even more frightening, because it alleges that if there is a lockout, and there will be (no way this gets done in a day), the owners will take all the small consolations and compromises they've offered off the table, and will opt instead for the NBA negotiating equivalent of a nuclear winter. 

From the Express News
According to NBA executives familiar with the league’s strategies, once the lockout is in place, the owners will push for a hard salary cap of $45 million, the elimination of guaranteed contracts and ask that the players swallow a 33 percent salary cut. The concessions made in recent weeks, including the “flex cap” of $62 million and a guarantee of $2 billion in annual player payroll, will be off the table.

If this seems certain to guarantee the loss of the entire 2011-12 season, it is because there are owners who think it is necessary for the long-term viability of the league. The players likely know this is coming because hints have been leaked for weeks. How they react to the old, hard line once the anticipated stoppage begins will determine the prospects for next season.
via Spurs Nation » Mike Monroe: It only gets harder for owners, players.

Ye Gods.

A move back to the hard line for the owners would force the players into a fight-or-flight response. They'd have no option to digging a trench for the long haul other than complete surrender. And given that they feel this fight is not just about themselves and their money, but about the future earning potential of professional basketball players (it's a brotherhood, if you haven't heard), they would get the shovels and sink in. We could lose the entirety of next season, if this report is accurate.

For everyone's sake, the fans, the owners, the players, the league personnel, and the business owners who profit in the communities, let's hope the owners recognize that there's a reason the Cold War remained cold. No one wins in the other scenario, except rival sports.
Comments

Since: Sep 4, 2007
Posted on: July 6, 2011 12:57 pm
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

I agree.  I think there is something about most employees that resent seeing someone succeed without doing it the "traditional" way.  It seems they feel threatened that someone who is not very educated for the most part be able to make millions.  Our society teaches us to go to school, get good grades, and go to work for someone until you are 65 or now 72.  Then if you saved/invested enough, maintain your standard of living.  Athletes are able to become wealthy beyond what most fans can imagine for themselves without going that route. Its an insult to the "norm".  They automatically side with the owners because in their world the owners determine their paycheck and hence their security.  They automatically want the players to get in line like they have to.



Since: Jul 23, 2008
Posted on: July 6, 2011 9:57 am
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

Montsho...even though this comment thread is now probably dead, again, I agree 100%. The players can state how much they think that they are worth, but ultimately the owners choose 1 of 2 things. Either sign that player or not. Pretty simple if you ask me. If I asked for a raise and wasn't given what I thought that I deserved, then I have the choose of taking whatever I can, or taking "my talents" to another organization. I don't see how people are missing that point entirely.



Since: Sep 4, 2007
Posted on: July 4, 2011 1:30 am
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

For those of you taking the "real world" stance, I hope you understand that contracts exist in the real world.  They are legally binding documents and the owner is well aware of this.  The employer/employee relationship tends to always favor the employer.  No matter how much you are paid as an employee, you better believe that the owner is making at least 3 times as much in profit.  My question is how do you knowingly sign a contract then try to get out of it because now your not making 3 times the amount in profit?  It was the owners fault for overpaying in the first place.  Its really amazing to me that employees would side with employers.  Shows just how far down the drain our perceptions have gone as Americans.



Since: Sep 4, 2007
Posted on: July 4, 2011 1:14 am
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

the nba has limited depth and thus and aging james posey is considered valuable to some teams and thus posey doesnt go unemployed

So I see you do agree. The teams (owners) set the market value.  If no one paid his price then his value goes down right?  He is only as valuable as what the owners think.  He can say he is worth 30 million a year.  Its not until the deal is inked that the market value is set.



Since: Sep 4, 2007
Posted on: July 4, 2011 12:57 am
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

except that 9 times out of ten its the players that are determining theyre own false (overpaid) value.

Not true.  They (their knowledgeable agent) are throwing out a number to set expectations.  The owners (GM's) determine the market value.  its like a house that you may think is worth 200K but you go look at the comps and the house down the street just like yours just sold for 100k.  Doesnt matter what you think its worth, its only worth what someone will pay for it.



Since: Mar 13, 2007
Posted on: July 2, 2011 5:06 pm
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

if for example james posey was a union worker in a "normal" job and they stopped appeasing to his demands of false value

he would be unemployed


but


the nba has limited depth and thus and aging james posey is considered valuable to some teams and thus posey doesnt go unemployed



Since: Mar 13, 2007
Posted on: July 2, 2011 5:03 pm
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

im not debating that the owners are at fault for writing up the overpaid contracts

however

someone mentioned the notion of if i was offered 100k and then asked 2 years later to have 50k

that would work.... except that 9 times out of ten its the players that are determining theyre own false (overpaid) value.

the year after the celtics won the title in 08 with james posey at the helm of the 6th man role

all over the news i heard words like "hes seaking one more big contract to secure him and his family"

james posey has sense disapeared if he plays in the league still he barely plays due to his age

BUT!

it was james posey who initiated his "demands" and boston saw it as bad business and then the hornets overpaid for him

yes you could blame the hornets but its posey that drove up his own market value

so siding with players like him i find very hard to believe

the NBA is the only league i know of that has an entire genre of trade value in expiring contracts.



Since: Mar 2, 2008
Posted on: July 1, 2011 7:27 pm
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

He just doesn't understand why entertainment always gets more value in terms of salary within a society.  Instead of lowly scrub worker doing his job whining about how he has a lowly scrub workin' job.  Do you see the pevious two sentences guy?  Your answer lies in those first two sentences.



Since: Sep 4, 2007
Posted on: July 1, 2011 5:20 pm
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

It is very hard for the average person to fell sorry for men playing a game and making more in one year than the average person makes in his lifetime. The players are selfish, care very little about their team , even the game.


Its called perspective as you conviently pointed out with your first sentence.  Since you dont have the perspective of the players then you are blinded by the filters over your eyes of an average person with which you view their world and situation.  So in your eyes the players are selfish.  Until you are a player then you probably should not make blanket statements about that which you are unable to understand.



Since: Jul 23, 2008
Posted on: July 1, 2011 10:17 am
 

Report: Owners will take hard line in a lockout

Redwing...I understand the risk thing completely. And for the record, for my job I am definitely not a union guy, but what I am getting at is the fact that the Players are NOT striking for more money, the Owners are locking them out because they no longer like what they established. Again, I don't make millions and never have been pampered all my life like some, if not most NBA/NFL athletes, but I recognize that I also wasn't blessed or worked hard enough on my athletic ability to begrudge them for being able to do what they do. All I can say is that they have a very unique skill set that "the market" has determined they should make x amount of dollars and that’s why any league just can't fire all the athletes and start over with "johnny from down the street". But personally speaking if I was asked to take a pay cut, recession or not, I am fighting to keep that salary regardless of the amount. There are greedy people, rich and poor, and I think that's what all this is about on BOTH sides, but I also believe that the players shouldn't be the only ones who are castrated in the argument. My heart doesn't necessarily bleed for any of them, especially for people who own a franchise for social standing and cry when they aren't turning a profit. As I said before (for their world, not ours), if you can't afford to lose money on something as big as an NBA or NFL franchise, then don't buy it!



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